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Americans Often Abandon Online Purchases Due to Security Concerns, Poll Finds

Majority of Americans Have Abandoned an Online Purchase Due to Security Concerns, Poll Finds

According to a national poll released today by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), 64 percent of Americans said they have not made an online purchase from a specific website because of security concerns.

Majority of Americans Have Abandoned an Online Purchase Due to Security Concerns, Poll Finds

According to a national poll released today by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), 64 percent of Americans said they have not made an online purchase from a specific website because of security concerns.

When asked to explain why they did not make that purchase, 60 percent said it was because they were not sure if the site was secure, 51.4 percent were worried about providing information requested, and 48.4 percent felt a website requested more information than was necessary for the transaction. Respondents were given the option to pick more than one reason.

Despite some security concerns, online shopping is a popular activity for Americans. The poll found that 69.3 percent research potential purchases over the Internet, 68 percent make purchases online, 62.4 percent make online payments, and 38 percent buy goods from online auction sites.

Interestingly, in a separate survey released this week by Internet security firm Webroot, more than half (55 per cent) of the 2,660 individual respondents from the United Kingdom, United States and Australia, say they plan to buy at least half of their gifts online this Christmas, up from 38 per cent of shoppers last year.

As a new area for security awareness, more Americans are shopping from their mobile phones, with those making online payments doubling to 8 percent from last year. Those researching potential purchases from their phones also grew to 16 percent, up from 9 percent in 2009. A recent study published by NCSA and Norton by Symantec found that 87 percent of Americans felt safer going online with their PCs than with their phones, spotlighting, new opportunities for consumer and industry awareness with the growth of mobile devices.

“Businesses should take note: online customers are looking to make purchases where they see signs that a website is secure, have a clear understanding of how information collected about them is going to be used, and only information necessary to the transaction is being collected,” said NCSA Executive Director Michael Kaiser. “Online shoppers are being smarter and safer online, and that’s good for everyone.”

The poll was conducted by Zogby/463 online between October 1 and October 5, 2010, with a sample size of 3,498 U.S. adults and margin of error +/- 1.7 percent. The sample is representative of the U.S. population.

As Cyber Monday approaches and online holiday shopping jumps, the NCSA reminds people to take a moment to practice “Stop. Think. Connect.,” the first coordinated online safety message adopted by a large coalition of government, industry and nonprofit organizations. Before you connect to the Internet, take a moment to evaluate that you’re prepared to share information or engage in a larger community. This will bring an increased sense of personal security, confidence, and peace of mind.

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