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Senator Ron Wyden instructs the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to implement HTTPS and other cybersecurity best practices on all its websites and web services [Read More]
Several critical and high severity vulnerabilities have been found in RTUs used in the energy sector in various European countries [Read More]
FBI admits that – due to flaws in methodology – it inflated the number of devices it could not analyze due to strong encryption [Read More]
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg apologized to the European Parliament on Tuesday for the "harm" caused by a huge breach of users' data and by a failure to crack down on fake news. [Read More]
Critics say the GDPR could take away an important tool used by law enforcement, security researchers, journalists and others. [Read More]
Multiple security flaws were recently found in Dell EMC RecoverPoint, including a Critical remote code execution vulnerability, security firm Foregenix reveals. [Read More]
The United States and China may have a tentative deal to save embattled Chinese telecom company ZTE, days after the two nations announced a truce in their trade standoff. [Read More]
Cloudflare announced a series of improvements to its Rate Limiting distributed denial of service (DDoS) protection tool this week. [Read More]
Activist groups urged Amazon to stop providing facial recognition technology to law enforcement, warning that it could give authorities "dangerous surveillance powers." [Read More]
Chinese researchers find over a dozen locally and remotely exploitable vulnerabilities in BMW cars. The company has confirmed the flaws and started rolling out patches [Read More]

SecurityWeek Experts

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David Holmes's picture
Forward Secrecy (sometimes called Perfect Forward Secrecy or PFS), is a cryptographic technique that adds an additional layer of confidentiality to an encrypted session, ensuring that only the two endpoints can decrypt the traffic.
Torsten George's picture
Microservices and containers enable faster application delivery and improved IT efficiency. However, the adoption of these technologies has outpaced security.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security.
Laurence Pitt's picture
The rapid proliferation of connected things is leaving networks exposed with more potential entry points that are vulnerable to attack.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With domain name WHOIS data subject to the GDPR’s privacy requirements, the system will “go dark” until alternative preparations are made, creating a challenge for this who fight computer fraud and other criminal activity on the Internet.
Joshua Goldfarb's picture
We can all be more understanding of people when they do exactly what we incentivize them to do. To that point, I offer “10 security behaviors that anger us, but that we incentivize".
Erin O’Malley's picture
SecOps and NetOps are starting to put aside their differences and find ways to work better together. As Gartner reports, these once distinct groups have begun to realize and accept that alignment is not a nice to have, but a business imperative.
Oliver Rochford's picture
We can’t rely on our own governments to practice responsible full disclosure. Full Disclosure is compromised. We can’t really blame them. Either everyone discloses, or no-one does.
Marc Solomon's picture
It is important for threat intelligence analysts, SOCs and incident responders to work together to take the right actions faster, reducing the time to response and remediation.