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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The US State Department -- on the front lines of the sensitive Iran nuclear negotiations -- said Thursday it was confident there had been no security breach, after Swiss and Austrian investigators launched probes into alleged cyber-spying.
49 individuals suspected of being part of a cybercrime ring have been arrested in Europe. They used malware and social engineering to defraud European companies.
The White House urged Congress to come out of the "dark ages" and pass new cyber security rules, using a massive security breach to press its case for reform.
President Barack Obama has approved giving the NSA wider powers to spy on Internet traffic in search of computer hacking by foreign governments or others.
The FBI warned lawmakers Wednesday there was no way to monitor encrypted online communications among Islamic State sympathizers and called for new laws to require technology firms to unlock any secret messages among jihadists.
Fugitive former US security contractor Edward Snowden on Tuesday hailed as "historic" efforts to end the bulk collection of Americans' phone records, while urging campaigners to go further.
The US Senate passed landmark legislation Tuesday that ends the government's bulk telephone data dragnet.
The US Senate on Tuesday advanced a landmark measure that ends the government's bulk data collection of Americans' phone records, while reauthorizing other surveillance powers that lapsed this week.
The US Senate failed Sunday to reach a deal that would prevent key counterterror provisions from expiring at midnight, after Senator Rand Paul blocked the chamber from advancing a solution.
CIA chief John Brennan warned Sunday that allowing vital surveillance programs to expire could increase terror threats, as the US Senate convened for a crunch debate on whether to renew the controversial provisions.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.