Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Two individuals suspected of developing and distributing the SpyEye Trojan have been sentenced to a combined 24 years in prison [Read More]
Apple received a total of 1,015 requests for account data from law enforcement agencies in the United States during the second half of 2015. [Read More]
Apple urged a federal court Friday to reject efforts to force the company to help break into an iPhone as part of a New York drug investigation. [Read More]
Authorities successfully disrupted a large-scale ATM skimming operation as part of a collaboration with Italian law enforcement, Europol announced Thursday. [Read More]
The California Assembly Bill 1681 was quietly dropped this week without a vote. The bill would have authorized $2,500 penalties for phone manufacturers and operating system providers if they do not comply with court orders to decrypt phones. [Read More]
Dmitry Fedotov, aka “Paunch,” the author of the Blackhole exploit kit, has been sentenced by a Russian court to 7 years in prison [Read More]
Microsoft sued the US government, arguing that secret warrants to search people's email violate the US Constitution. [Read More]
Former employee of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sentenced to 18 months in prison for attempted spear-phishing attack [Read More]
US lawmakers unveiled legislation to require technology firms to help law enforcement unlock encrypted devices -- prompting a fierce outcry from the industry and privacy activists. [Read More]
Professional grey hat hackers helped the FBI hack the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, not Cellebrite [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

rss icon

Wade Williamson's picture
Asking for security backdoors that only benefit the good guys is like asking for bullets that only hurt the bad guys. That’s simply not how encryption works.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.