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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Technology firms will ultimately prevail in their efforts to use strong encryption on devices that cannot be accessed by the government, Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt said.
Americans have been stepping up efforts to keep their data private since the revelations about vast US government surveillance programs, a survey showed.
The Senate Intelligence Committee passed the controversial Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, or CISA, by a vote of 14 to 1 on Thursday afternoon.
Web hosting provider DreamHost has issued its first ever transparency report to show off how frequently the company did not comply with government requests.
The CIA has been working for years to break encryption on Apple devices, to spy on communications of iPhone and iPad users, according to a report.
Three individuals were indicted last week for their alleged role in what is said to be one of the largest reported data breaches in the United States.
British authorities have arrested a 23-year-old man over a hacking attack on the US Department of Defense, one of 56 people detained in a week-long crackdown on cyber-crime
Edward Snowden, the fugitive whistleblower who has been given refuge in Russia, is willing to return to the United States if he is given a fair trial, his lawyer said Tuesday.
Canada's electronic eavesdropping agency has amassed a huge trove of emails sent to the government, as part of its cybersecurity mandate, according to a leaked secret document Wednesday.
NSA chief Admiral Michael Rogers said intelligence services need access to encrypted devices to thwart terrorism, and hopes to find common ground with the tech sector on the issue.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.