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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Russian man wanted by the FBI in GameOver Zeus case might have conducted espionage for Russia.
The FBI is having trouble filling jobs for its cybersecurity programs because of comparatively low pay and rigorous background checks, an auditor's report says.
Rook Security has released a free software tool designed to help organizations determine if they have been impacted by malware developed by Italian surveillance software maker Hacking Team.
Darkode was taken down this week in an operation by 20 countries including the United States and such far flung nations as Australia and Cyprus.
A man suspected of belonging to a network of Islamist hackers responsible for attacks on more than 3,500 websites worldwide was arrested in Bulgaria.
CloudFlare received more than 65 governmental requests in the first half of 2015, much more than in the previous period.
Hacking Team is preparing to launch a completely new version of its surveillance software. Researchers continue to analyze leaked code.
Six Nigerian nationals have been extradited from South Africa for their alleged role in Internet scams involving dating websites and work-at-home schemes, the US Department of Justice said.
Man said to be the mastermind of the cyber fraud scheme in which 4 million computers were infected with DNSChanger malware pleads guilty.
Aside from listening in on Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff's phone calls, US spies also targeted top political and financial officials, according to new information released by WikiLeaks on Saturday.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.