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Bishop Fox Releases Open Source Cloud Hacking Tool ‘CloudFox’

Cybersecurity firm Bishop Fox has announced the release of CloudFox, an open source tool designed to help find exploitable attack paths in cloud infrastructure.

The command line tool has been created for penetration testers and other offensive security professionals.

Cybersecurity firm Bishop Fox has announced the release of CloudFox, an open source tool designed to help find exploitable attack paths in cloud infrastructure.

The command line tool has been created for penetration testers and other offensive security professionals.

CloudFox provides a collection of enumeration commands that make it easy to use even for people who are relatively new to cloud pentesting.

As of now it only works with AWS, but Bishop Fox also plans on adding support for Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, and Kubernetes.

“CloudFox is designed to be executed by a principal with limited read-only permissions, but its purpose is to help you find attack paths that can be exploited in simulated compromise scenarios (aka, objective based penetration testing),” Bishop Fox explained.

The tool can identify the regions used by the AWS account and the number of resources in common services, secrets in EC2 user data, the principal’s permissions, exposed endpoints or IPs, and file systems that can be mounted from a compromised resource from within the VPC.

“There are a lot of tools that help you analyze cloud environments, but many of them are more focused on security baseline compliance rather than attack paths. We hope you find that CloudFox can automate the boring stuff and help you identify and exploit latent attack paths more quickly and comprehensively,” said Seth Art, principal security consultant at Bishop Fox.

The CloudFox source code is available on GitHub. Additional technical details and a demo video can be found in a blog post published by Bishop Fox.

Related: New Open Source Tool Shows Code Injected Into Websites by In-App Browsers

Related: Aqua Security Ships Open Source Tool for Auditing Software Supply Chain

Related: Academics Devise Open Source Tool For Hunting Node.js Security Flaws

Written By

Eduard Kovacs (@EduardKovacs) is a contributing editor at SecurityWeek. He worked as a high school IT teacher for two years before starting a career in journalism as Softpedia’s security news reporter. Eduard holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial informatics and a master’s degree in computer techniques applied in electrical engineering.

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