Security Experts:

Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

SecurityWeekSecurityWeek

Cyberwarfare

Atomic Energy Agency: Experts’ Email Addresses Stolen from Old Server

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reportedly is taking steps to secure its information after data was stolen from one of its former servers and posted online.

According to the IAEA, the stolen data includes email addresses for some experts working with the agency. The data was posted online by a group going by the name Parastoo, which in Farsi translates to “swallow.”

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reportedly is taking steps to secure its information after data was stolen from one of its former servers and posted online.

According to the IAEA, the stolen data includes email addresses for some experts working with the agency. The data was posted online by a group going by the name Parastoo, which in Farsi translates to “swallow.”

In a statement posted by the group on Pastebin, the hackers call for an investigation into nuclear activities by Israel, which historically has refused to confirm or deny whether or not it has nuclear weapons. The group also stated that it has evidence showing there are “beyond-harmful operations taking place” at Israel’s Negev Nuclear Research Center, located outside Dimona, and that the people whose email addresses the group published could be considered partners in crime if an accident should happen there.

IAEA spokeswoman Gill Tudor told Reuters that the agency “deeply regrets this publication of information stolen from an old server that was shut down some time ago” and that measures had been taken to address a possible vulnerability on the affected server.

“The IAEA’s technical and security teams are continuing to analyze the situation and do everything possible to help ensure that no further information is vulnerable,” Tudor said.

Currently, the IAEA is heading up an investigation into Iran’s nuclear enrichment program. According to Reuters, a Western diplomat said the stolen information does not include any information related to that investigation.

Israel and the United States have accused Iran of trying to develop a nuclear weapon, and have been linked in news reports to efforts to destabilize those activities. Among those efforts was an intelligence operation code-named ‘Olympic Games’, which many believe led to the creation and deployment of the Stuxnet malware detected in Iran’s nuclear facility in Bushehr in 2010.

Written By

Click to comment

Expert Insights

Related Content

Cyberwarfare

Websites of German airports, administration bodies and banks were hit by DDoS attacks attributed to Russian hacker group Killnet

Cyberwarfare

Iranian APT Moses Staff is leaking data stolen from Saudi Arabia government ministries under the recently created Abraham's Ax persona

Cyberwarfare

The UK’s NCSC has issued a security advisory to warn about spearphishing campaigns conducted by two unrelated Russian and Iranian hacker groups.

Cyberwarfare

Russia-linked cyberespionage group APT29 has been observed using embassy-themed lures and the GraphicalNeutrino malware in recent attacks.

Cybercrime

Artificial intelligence is competing in another endeavor once limited to humans — creating propaganda and disinformation.

Cyberwarfare

WASHINGTON - Cyberattacks are the most serious threat facing the United States, even more so than terrorism, according to American defense experts. Almost half...

Cybercrime

Albanian prosecutors on Wednesday asked for the house arrest of five public employees they blame for not protecting the country from a cyberattack by...

Application Security

Virtualization technology giant VMware on Tuesday shipped urgent updates to fix a trio of security problems in multiple software products, including a virtual machine...