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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Microsoft this week announced that end-to-end encrypted communications are now available for preview to Skype insiders. [Read More]
High-Tech Bridge improves Trademark Monitoring Radar with new feature designed to identify squatted or fraudulent accounts on social networks and code repositories [Read More]
Russia-linked hackers leaked private correspondence between International Olympic Committee officials in response to Russia being banned from the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Games [Read More]
At least three class action lawsuits have been filed against Intel over the recently disclosed Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities [Read More]
DMARC implemented on roughly half of US government domains as a result of a DHS directive, but only 16% quarantine or reject unauthenticated emails [Read More]
Trackmageddon - researchers discovered that over 100 online GPS services have vulnerabilities that expose location and other data associated with millions of tracking devices [Read More]
Nissan Canada is informing more than 1.1 million customers that their personal information may have been compromised as a result of a data breach [Read More]
Keeper Security files lawsuit against Ars Technica and reporter Dan Goodin over article covering critical vulnerability found by Google researcher [Read More]
The French privacy regulator, the National Commission of Computing and Freedoms (CNIL) has issued a formal notice on WhatsApp. [Read More]
Kaspersky files lawsuit against the U.S. government over the DHS operational directive ordering federal agencies to stop using the company’s products [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Jalal Bouhdada's picture
Jalal Bouhdada, Founder and Principal ICS Security Consultant at Applied Risk, discusses the implications of the new EU Directive on Security of Network and Information Systems (NIS)
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Alastair Paterson's picture
What can U.S.-based companies do to prepare for the GDPR that is due to come into force in May 2018? These five steps can help.
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Steven Grossman's picture
Why do we seem to need layer upon layer of regulation and guidance to try to ensure a more secure business world? Is it working?
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Travis Greene's picture
Reducing the amount of personal data subject to GDPR is a critical step towards minimizing the amount of risk that GDPR will expose.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.