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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Equifax shares more details about the breach and how it was discovered by the company [Read More]
CEO Eugene Kaspersky will testify before Congress regarding the use of Kaspersky products by the U.S. government [Read More]
DHS orders government agencies to stop using Kaspersky products due to concerns about the company’s ties to Russian intelligence [Read More]
Zerodium is offering a total of $1 million for Tor Browser zero-day exploits that it will sell to governments [Read More]
Microsoft patches .NET zero-day vulnerability exploited to deliver FinFisher spyware to Russian users [Read More]
Apache Struts 2 vulnerability reportedly exploited to hack Equifax and gain access to customer data [Read More]
Industry professionals comment on the Equifax hack, which may affect as many as 143 million people [Read More]
Smiths Medical Medfusion 4000 wireless syringe infusion pumps affected by serious flaws. Patches coming only next year [Read More]
Europe's top rights court on Sept. 5 restricted the ability of employers to snoop on their staff's private messages, in a landmark ruling with wide ramifications for privacy in the workplace. [Read More]
Lenovo settles FTC charges over the Superfish adware shipped with many of its laptops, but the company will not pay a fine [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Steven Grossman's picture
Why do we seem to need layer upon layer of regulation and guidance to try to ensure a more secure business world? Is it working?
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Travis Greene's picture
Reducing the amount of personal data subject to GDPR is a critical step towards minimizing the amount of risk that GDPR will expose.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Steven Grossman's picture
The PCI DSS 3.2 should greatly help companies reduce third party vendor risk, and is starting to shift from just a check-the-compliance-box activity to a more continuous compliance model.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.
David Holmes's picture
The portion of encrypted traffic keeps rising, so IT security administrators will be forced to do more SSL decryption if they are to get any value at all out of their fancy security tools.