Security Experts:

Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

SecurityWeekSecurityWeek

Cybercrime

Petition Seeks to Legalize DDoS Activities

Anonymous is petitioning the White House to legalize DDoS, urging them to recognize it as a legitimate means of protest. But based on the number of signatures so far, it  seems as though few people agree.

Anonymous is petitioning the White House to legalize DDoS, urging them to recognize it as a legitimate means of protest. But based on the number of signatures so far, it  seems as though few people agree.

DDoS attacks can lead to downtime, and if an organization’s business model is based on uptime and Web-based communications, then a DDoS attack – or protest – translates into lost productivity, and a potential for lost revenue.

AnonymousYet, this is no different than having 10,000 people block the street leading to the organization’s front door. There will be lost productivity – as the customers cannot access the business itself leaving the staff to wander the halls – and revenue will fall as sales are not being made.

In that context, DDoS does seem like a valid level of protest. However, legislators disagree, and the act of launching a DDoS attack can lead to prison sentences and heavy fines. Whereas coordinating a physical protest (i.e. blocking the street) is worth nothing more than a slap on the wrist in comparison.

“With the advance in internet techonology, comes new grounds for protesting. Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS), is not any form of hacking in any way. It is the equivalent of repeatedly hitting the refresh button on a webpage. It is, in that way, no different than any “occupy” protest. Instead of a group of people standing outside a building to occupy the area, they are having their computer occupy a website to slow (or deny) service of that particular website for a short time. As part of this petition, those who have been jailed for DDoS should be immediatly released and have anything regarding a DDoS, that is on their “records”, cleared,” the petition says.

Currently, there are only 2,125 signatures, far less than the 25,000 needed before the White House has to answer, or even acknowledge the request. While the petition raises some interesting points, it is unlikely that the White House will make any moves to legalize DDoS any time soon.

Written By

Click to comment

Daily Briefing Newsletter

Subscribe to the SecurityWeek Email Briefing to stay informed on the latest threats, trends, and technology, along with insightful columns from industry experts.

Expert Insights

Related Content

Cybercrime

Zendesk is informing customers about a data breach that started with an SMS phishing campaign targeting the company’s employees.

Cybercrime

The release of OpenAI’s ChatGPT in late 2022 has demonstrated the potential of AI for both good and bad.

Cybercrime

The FBI dismantled the network of the prolific Hive ransomware gang and seized infrastructure in Los Angeles that was used for the operation.

Cybercrime

A new study by McAfee and the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) named a staggering figure as the true annual cost of...

Cybercrime

CISA, NSA, and MS-ISAC issued an alert on the malicious use of RMM software to steal money from bank accounts.

Cybercrime

Video games developer Riot Games says source code was stolen from its development environment in a ransomware attack

Application Security

PayPal is alerting roughly 35,000 individuals that their accounts have been targeted in a credential stuffing campaign.

Cybercrime

A recently disclosed vBulletin vulnerability, which had a zero-day status for roughly two days last week, was exploited in a hacker attack targeting the...