Security Experts:

One Year After WannaCry Outbreak, EternalBlue Exploit Still a Threat

One year after the WannaCry ransomware outbreak, the NSA-linked exploit used for propagation is still threatening unpatched and unprotected systems, security researchers say.

The WannaCry infection started on May 12, 2017, disrupting Spanish businesses and dozens of hospitals in the U.K. The malware hit Windows 7 the most and was estimated to have infected nearly half a million computers and other types of devices within 10 days.

The largest number of machines was hit in the first hours of the outbreak, before a security researcher discovered a kill-switch and slowed the spreading to a near stop.

“WannaCry served as a cybersecurity wake-up call for many organizations that were falling behind in their routine IT responsibilities,” Ken Spinner, VP of Field Engineering, Varonis, told SecurityWeek in an emailed comment.

“While WannaCry tore through organizations like the NHS, companies that kept their systems updated with the latest patches, performed backups and took proactive security measures emerged unscathed,” Spinner continued.

WannaCry was able to spread fast because it abused an exploit supposedly stolen from the National Security Agency-linked Equation Group. Called EternalBlue, the exploit was made public in April 2017, one month after Microsoft released a patch for it.

EternalBlue is targeting a vulnerability in Windows’ Server Message Block (SMB) on port 445, but only older operating system versions (mainly Windows XP and Windows 7) are impacted.

Although it brought the exploit to the spotlight, WannaCry wasn’t the first malware to abuse it. During the weeks prior to the outbreak, EternalBlue was leveraged by a crypto-currency mining botnet and a backdoor. A ransomware family called UIWIX was also observed abusing it around the same period.

Despite Microsoft releasing a couple of patches for the security flaw targeted by EternalBlue, including an emergency patch for unsupported systems, tens of thousands of systems continued to be vulnerable last summer.

WannaCry, which was supposedly the work of North Korean actors, managed to wreak havoc a year ago, but it died fast. EternalBlue, on the other hand, remained strong, and was also abused in the global NotPetya attack last year.

In fact, security researchers say that the NSA-linked exploit is currently more popular among cybercriminals than it was a year ago.

Overall, more than 2 million users were observed being hit via the exploit from May 2017 to May 2018, Moscow-based security firm Kaspersky Lab told SecurityWeek.

The number of unique users hit by EternalBlue was 10 times higher in April 2018 compared to May 2017, with an average of more than 240,000 users being attacked via this exploit every month, the security firm also said.

“The fact that hackers keep targeting users using the EternalBlue exploit in their attacks means that many systems remain unpatched, which could lead to some dangerous consequences. It’s still highly important for organizations to take a close look at the security of their networks. Their first priority should be to install all necessary patches on time, in order to avoid losses in the future,” said Anton Ivanov, lead malware analyst, Kaspersky Lab.

According to ESET, not only did the popularity of EternalBlue increase significantly over the past months, but a “recent spike even surpassed the greatest peaks from 2017.”

Following a calmer period after the WannaCry attack, when only hundreds of detections were observed daily, the use of EternalBlue started picking up pace in September last year and reached new heights in mid-April 2018.

A Satan ransomware campaign observed last month likely contributed to the latest spike, but the exploit might have been used in other malicious activities as well, the researchers say.

“This exploit and all the attacks it has enabled so far highlight the importance of timely patching as well as the need for a reliable and multi-layered security solution that can block the underlying malicious tool,” ESET points out.

The main reason EternalBlue’s usage is spiking is the existence of millions of vulnerable devices that continue to be exposed to the Internet, as Mounir Hahad, head of Juniper Threat Labs at Juniper Networks, told SecurityWeek.

“Immediately after the WannaCry epidemic last year, most security researchers advised people to disable SMBv1 entirely and make sure SMBv2 was not exposed to the internet. One year later and we are still seeing about 2.3M devices with SMBv1 exposed to the internet, with the majority of these vulnerable machines in the UAE, US, Russia, Taiwan and Japan,” Hahad said. 

"The same mitigation techniques that have been recommended over and over again are still relevant and effective to minimize the impacts of a ransomware attack, but it comes down to actually implementing them,” Hahad continued.

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