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Kaspersky Open Sources Internal Distributed YARA Scanner

Kaspersky Lab has released the source code of an internally-developed distributed YARA scanner as a way of giving back to the infosec community.

Originally developed by VirusTotal software engineer Victor Alvarez, YARA is a tool that allows researchers to analyze and detect malware by creating rules that describe threats based on textual or binary patterns.

Kaspersky Lab has developed its own version of the YARA tool. Named KLara, the Python-based application relies on a distributed architecture to allow researchers to quickly scan large collections of malware samples.

Looking for potential threats in the wild requires a significant amount of resources, which can be provided by cloud systems. Using a distributed architecture, KLara allows researchers to efficiently scan one or more YARA rules over large data collections – Kaspersky says it can scan 10Tb of files in roughly 30 minutes.

“The project uses the dispatcher/worker model, with the usual architecture of one dispatcher and multiple workers. Worker and dispatcher agents are written in Python. Because the worker agents are written in Python, they can be deployed in any compatible ecosystem (Windows or UNIX). The same logic applies to the YARA scanner (used by KLara): it can be compiled on both platforms,” Kaspersky explained.

KLara provides a web-based interface where users can submit jobs, check their status, and view results. Results can also be sent to a specified email address.

The tool also provides an API that can be used to submit new jobs, get job results and details, and retrieve the matched MD5 hashes.

Kaspersky Lab has relied on YARA in many of its investigations, but one of the most notable cases involved the 2015 Hacking Team breach. The security firm wrote a YARA rule based on information from the leaked Hacking Team files, and several months later it led to the discovery of a Silverlight zero-day vulnerability.

The KLara source code is available on GitHub under a GNU General Public License v3.0. Kaspersky says it welcomes contributions to the project.

This is not the first time Kaspersky has made available the source code of one of its internal tools. Last year, it released the source code of Bitscout, a compact and customizable tool designed for remote digital forensics operations.

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Eduard Kovacs (@EduardKovacs) is a contributing editor at SecurityWeek. He worked as a high school IT teacher for two years before starting a career in journalism as Softpedia’s security news reporter. Eduard holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial informatics and a master’s degree in computer techniques applied in electrical engineering.