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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A cyber specialist who worked at the US National Security Agency and an army doctor and his wife were charged in separate cases with seeking to sell US secrets to foreign governments. [Read More]
SentinelLabs researchers are kick-starting a crowdsourced effort to understand a new mysterious APT hitting hitting telcos, ISPs and universities in the Middle East and Africa. [Read More]
Civil rights lawyers and senators are pushing for legislation that would limit U.S. law enforcement agencies’ ability to buy cellphone tracking tools to follow people’s whereabouts. [Read More]
Australian police are investigating a purported hacker’s release of the stolen personal data of 10,000 Optus customers and demand for a $1 million ransom in cryptocurrency. [Read More]
The Ukrainian government is proactively warning that Russia is planning “massive cyberattacks” against critical infrastructure targets in the energy sector. [Read More]
A 17-year-old from the UK has been arrested on suspicion of hacking for his alleged involvement in the recent Rockstar Games and Uber hacks. [Read More]
Ukrainian authorities take down a hacking group that compromised roughly 30 million user accounts and sold them on dark web portals. [Read More]
European Parliament members investigating the use of surveillance spyware by European Union governments sharply criticized Israel for a lack of transparency in allowing the sale of powerful Israeli spyware to European governments. [Read More]
The FBI has observed an increase in attacks targeting healthcare payment processors to divert millions of dollars. [Read More]
The US Department of Justice announced an indictment Wednesday against three Iranian hackers who used ransomware to extort a battered women's shelter and a power company. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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Landon Winkelvoss's picture
Similar to investigations that disrupt cyberattacks on retailers, the same tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) can be leveraged against those that sell counterfeit or stolen goods.
Gordon Lawson's picture
Threat hunting must be non-attributable, while maintaining a clear audit trail to satisfy legal and governance requirements.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Taking down dark web sites may cause headache for both the bad guys and the good guys, but it can also have a profound positive effect on the fight against cybercrime.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Wade Williamson's picture
Asking for security backdoors that only benefit the good guys is like asking for bullets that only hurt the bad guys. That’s simply not how encryption works.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.