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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The city of Baltimore is set to purchase $20 million in cyber insurance coverage, five months after an attack hobbled its computer network. [Read More]
Russia-linked threat actor APT29 has been successfully avoiding detection for the past three years while compromising multiple government targets. [Read More]
Researchers have identified what appears to be the first crypto-jacking worm that spreads using Docker containers. [Read More]
ESET researchers identify a new backdoor associated with the threat actor known as the Winnti Group. [Read More]
Some services at global shipping and ecommerce giant Pitney Bowes disrupted after a file-encrypting ransomware infected some systems. [Read More]
A recently uncovered highly targeted cyber-espionage platform that uses Tor for network communication has been targeting Russia and Eastern Europe. [Read More]
DCH Health System said key operations were back to normal 10 days after a ransomware attack encrypted information and prevented its hospital computer systems from communicating with each other. [Read More]
Magecart hackers have been gathering sensitive information from thousands of online shops after compromising top ecommerce platform and service provider Volusion. [Read More]
The BitPaymer ransomware operators were observed abusing a zero-day vulnerability in Apple’s iTunes for Windows to run code and evade detection. [Read More]
Global ransomware attacks are on the decline, but such malicious cyber strikes are getting bolder and homing in on more profitable companies, with data encryption a key target, says Europol. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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John Maddison's picture
Intent-based segmentation, deception technology, and an integrated security fabric are essential tools in beating malware designed to avoid detection and analysis.
Justin Fier's picture
The origin story of Mimikatz — a post-exploitation module that has enabled criminals to steal millions of passwords around the world — reads like an over-the-top spy thriller.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
Historical patterns and recent activity indicate that another major Necurs malware outbreak is looming just around the corner.