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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A Connecticut school district's teachers are working without computer access less than a week after a second malware attack targeted the district's servers. [Read More]
ESET security researchers have discovered a new backdoor associated with the United Arab Emirates (UAE)-linked Stealth Falcon threat actor. [Read More]
U.S. Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) has added 11 malware samples to VirusTotal, all of which appear related to the notorious North Korean-linked threat group Lazarus. [Read More]
The China-linked threat actor tracked as Thrip has continued to target entities in Southeast Asia and Symantec has determined that it’s actually a subgroup of Billbug/Lotus Blossom. [Read More]
Industry professionals comment on reports that an Iranian mole helped the US and Israel plant the Stuxnet malware on computers at an Iranian nuclear facility. [Read More]
The Texas Department of Information Resources (DIR) says it is not aware of any ransom being paid to recover systems affected by a recent ransomware attack. [Read More]
A Massachusetts mayor says hackers demanded $5.3 million from his city in a ransomware attack this summer. [Read More]
The risk associated with crimeware is underestimated, despite a continuous increase in attacks involving financially motivated malware, Chronicle finds. [Read More]
The operators behind TrickBot have made heavy use of evasion and anti-analysis techniques in recently observed attacks. [Read More]
The threat actor behind the infamous TrickBot botnet has added new functionality to their malware to request PIN codes from mobile users, Secureworks reports. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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John Maddison's picture
Intent-based segmentation, deception technology, and an integrated security fabric are essential tools in beating malware designed to avoid detection and analysis.
Justin Fier's picture
The origin story of Mimikatz — a post-exploitation module that has enabled criminals to steal millions of passwords around the world — reads like an over-the-top spy thriller.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
Historical patterns and recent activity indicate that another major Necurs malware outbreak is looming just around the corner.