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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The U.S. is bracing for cyberattacks Iran could launch in retaliation for the re-imposition of sanctions this week by President Donald Trump [Read More]
Researchers disclosed the details of two serious vulnerabilities affecting ATM dispenser controllers from NCR. The flaws could have been exploited to install vulnerable firmware and get ATMs to dispense cash [Read More]
Following trails of reused code, security researchers have uncovered new links between malware families attributed to North Korean threat groups and tracked most of the samples to the infamous Lazarus Group. [Read More]
To gain a better understanding of Asian onion sites and black markets, researchers from IntSights embarked on a six-month long investigation and analysis. [Read More]
The "DarkHydrus" hackers are leveraging the open-source Phishery tool to create malicious documents used in attacks on government entities in the Middle East. [Read More]
In a survey of 900 respondents, 4.6 believe that their colleagues are grey hats -- or, as the report puts it, a full-time security professional that is a black hat on the side. [Read More]
Hackers obtained some source code for the iOS version of Snapchat and made it public on GitHub after claiming that the company ignored them [Read More]
Duo Security creates open source tools and discloses techniques for identifying large-scale Twitter botnets – based on the analysis of 88 million accounts and over half-a-billion tweets [Read More]
With midterm elections just months away, political campaigns report that they’re largely on their own in the increasingly challenging task of protecting sensitive information. [Read More]
Chipmaker giant TSMC said Monday the computer virus that brought its production to a halt for two days was a variant of the WannaCry ransomware that hit users all around the world [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Laurence Pitt's picture
While awareness is key and technology is a great assistant, there is one simple practice we can all adopt: think before you click or share.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Alastair Paterson's picture
By closely following trends watching for new activities and actors across a variety of data sources, security professionals can continue to take steps to mitigate the digital risk to their enterprises, partners and customers.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
Galina Antova's picture
We must recognize industrial cyberattacks as tactics in a new form of “economic warfare” being waged between nation-states to gain economic and political advantage without having to pay the price of open combat.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.