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Virus & Threats
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Vulnerabilities in hundreds of thousands of IP cameras render them susceptible to malware compromise. [Read More]
Google this week released the December 2016 set of monthly patches for the Android platform which resolved a total of 74 vulnerabilities, 11 which were rated Critical severity. [Read More]
Flash Player, Internet Explorer, Windows and Silverlight are the pieces of software most targeted by exploit kits in 2016 [Read More]
Researchers discover a backdoor in 80 Sony security cameras. The vendor has released firmware updates to patch the flaw [Read More]
Nintendo is prepared to pay between $100 and $20,000 for vulnerabilities found in its 3DS consoles [Read More]
Google this week released Chrome 55 to resolve 36 security vulnerabilities and to switch the popular Adobe Flash plugin off by default. [Read More]
China-linked cyberspies known as Ixeshe and APT12 use Internet Explorer exploit to target Taiwan government organizations [Read More]
A communication protocol used by Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs) is weak enough to allow even attackers without advanced knowledge to exploit vulnerabilities and execute attacks. [Read More]
Vulnerabilities in the Android remote management tool AirDroid potentially impact over 50 million devices, security researchers at Zimperium zLabs warn. [Read More]
Google has launched the beta of OSS-Fuzz to help developers locate bugs in software that eventually lead to breaches. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Threats

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David Holmes's picture
Many can figure out how to hack Smart-city services using simple techniques like replay to get free services or, in some cases, make a little bit of money.
Torsten George's picture
Faced with hundreds, thousands, and even hundreds of thousands of vulnerabilities across their IT infrastructures leaves security practitioners at a virtually insurmountable disadvantage.
Jim Ivers's picture
As with any business relationship, you should use software or open source components from your allies with your eyes open to the potential risks.
Erin O’Malley's picture
What’s worse than having to cook a Thanksgiving turkey? How about being forced to relegate the poor bird to a crock pot after discovering that your net-connected oven and wireless meat thermometer have both been hacked?
Alastair Paterson's picture
Understanding what makes a good exploit kit is the first step in protecting against such attacks. But what else can you do to prevent adversaries from using exploit kits against your organization?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
The interests of the researchers should be to make the world more secure, not profit from a corporation’s vulnerabilities.
Scott Gainey's picture
There’s a difference between “nice-to-have” security products and “must-have” security products. The “must-haves” are critical to protecting organizations from cyber attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
I know I no longer have much trust in the connected devices in my home, and wonder what they do with their spare time.
Travis Greene's picture
A reliance on Internet voting with current technology will lead to the disenfranchisement of voters and manipulation by foreign or domestic attackers.
Jim Ivers's picture
Mature organizations should adopt a blended approach that employs testing tools at various stages in the development life cycle.