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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Europol has declared war on ransomware with the launch today of its 'no more ransom' initiative. [Read More]
The actor behind the Kovter Trojan has come up with a new persistence mechanism, and is masquerading the malware as a Chrome update, Microsoft security researchers warn. [Read More]
CTB-Faker claims that users’ files were encrypted by CTB-Locker, the claim is far from true. [Read More]
CryptXXX, the ransomware family that steals user data in addition to holding it hostage, might soon see tough competition from newcomer CrypMIC. [Read More]
Recent updates to Petya ransomware no longer allow for easy data recovery, researchers warn. [Read More]
CryptXXX, one of the most prevalent ransomware variants out there, is now leveraging spam emails for distribution, researchers at Proofpoint warn. [Read More]
Nearly one million Android users have fallen victims to eight fake applications that falsely claimed to help them gain more followers on social networks, but instead stole their information and money. [Read More]
Symantec researchers have discovered a Trojan that prevents users from making outgoing calls to banks from their smartphones. [Read More]
Previously, blocking C&C connections could keep Locky from encrypting files on a system, but the ransomware is now able to encrypt files without connecting to a command and control server. [Read More]
A lifetime license to use the Stampado ransomware in attacks costs $39 on the Dark Web. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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Erin O’Malley's picture
Hackers are humans, too, and most humans tend to veer toward the path of least resistance. So why wouldn’t they choose an easy—and lucrative—target like a hospital?
Alastair Paterson's picture
Cyber situational awareness can give you greater insights into the tools and processes used by actors that employ DDoS-based extortion and compromised data release extortion.
David Holmes's picture
A cyber espionage attack against Swiss defense firm RUAG was carried out by the Russia-linked hackers according to a report commissioned by the Swiss government.
Wade Williamson's picture
Behavioral detection models can focus in on what the attacker actually does, instead of relying on a set of signatures or known indicators of compromise that often lag behind attackers.
Jack Danahy's picture
Typical lockdown or encryption of a system happens within a minute or two of the ransomware’s execution. At that point, there are only two choices left: pay or start cleaning up.
Torsten George's picture
What do enterprises need to know about ransomware attacks and what can they do to minimize the risk of being victimized?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
It is critical for business leadership to address the growing threat of ransomware as a business risk rather than a siloed IT issue.
Wade Williamson's picture
The evolution of ransomware from simple malware to more persistent attacks has a major impact on the way enterprise security teams have to think about mitigation.
Scott Gainey's picture
By monitoring for and detecting the underlying and shared behaviors of malware we can effectively stop ransomware infections before they can cause damage.
Shlomo Kramer's picture
Mid-market enterprises with limited resources and weak defenses are a particularly good target for ransomware attacks: they have just enough assets worth paying for, and the capital to do so.