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Cybercrime
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Dropbox released another transparency report on Thursday and announced that moving forward, it will do so every six months in an effort to keep the public informed of its interactions with authorities.
US authorities threatened to fine Yahoo $250,000 a day if it failed to comply with a secret surveillance program.
The two groups are going after a number of different types of targets, including the defense and high-tech sectors, according to FireEye.
Researchers have been monitoring attacks in which cybercriminals hijack the routers of users in Brazil in an effort to redirect them to malicious websites.
Google says most of the roughly 5 million Gmail address and password combinations posted online would not have worked to access Gmail accounts.
Cybercriminals have been serving malicious advertisements on several high-profile websites in an effort to push shady software onto the computers of their visitors, regardless if they are Windows or OS X users, Cisco reported on Monday.
The breach affected customers at its stores in the U.S. and Canada, according to the company.
The official website of an important Israeli think tank has been compromised and abused to distribute a piece of malware, the security firm Cyphort reported on Friday.
A Windows backdoor used in numerous attacks by a certain threat group has been ported to Mac OS X and fitted with new features, researchers at FireEye reported.
U.S. law enforcement authorities claim to have leveraged a leaky CAPTCHA on the login page of Silk Road to identify the real IP address of the server hosting the website.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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James McFarlin's picture
Creative disruption, where a paradigm shift in thinking replaces an existing order, may be an elusive concept but its power as a driving force of human behavior cannot be denied.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Marc Solomon's picture
Malvertising underscores the need for an approach to security that addresses the full attack continuum. With ongoing visibility and control, and intelligent and continuous updates, security professionals can take action to stop the inevitable outbreak.
James McFarlin's picture
One can only hope our nation’s alarm clocks wake up and stir our national leaders’ imaginations before a cyber incident of the magnitude of 9/11 results in the need for a “Cyber Strikes Commission Report.”
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Cybercrime “case studies” are always impersonal, right? Would you get more out of specific stories of individuals caught in the cross hairs instead of corporate entities?
Wade Williamson's picture
The most important aspect for us as security professionals is to realize that the man-in-the-browser is not going away, and to understand what exactly has made it so successful.
Mark Hatton's picture
So what does the World Cup have to do with cyber security? A great deal actually. Anytime there is a large-scale global event, there is a sharp spike in the number of cyber scams that are unleashed.
Tal Be'ery's picture
Defenders should use their "Strategic Depth" to mitigate attacks not on the perimeter but deeper within their network where they can leverage on their strategic advantage.
Wade Williamson's picture
In the same way we have watched APT techniques trickle down from nation-state actors to more opportunistic criminals, we should expect MitB to expand from financial services to all types of applications.
Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.