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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Microsoft has released another report detailing the tactics, techniques and procedures of the SolarWinds hackers. [Read More]
The multi-stage, tag-based malicious ad campaign is heavily obfuscated and employs clever tricks to avoid detection. [Read More]
DNSpooq is the name given to 7 Dnsmasq vulnerabilities that could expose millions of devices to DNS cache poisoning, remote code execution and DoS attacks. [Read More]
Going after high profile victims appears to have allowed Ryuk ransomware operators to build a highly lucrative malware enterprise. [Read More]
The Canadian data security startup closes a Series A funding round to expand its data discovery and classification offerings. [Read More]
The agency says poor cyber hygiene practices lead to compromise via cloud services. [Read More]
The National Security Agency (NSA) released its 2020 Cybersecurity Year in Review report, which summarizes the NSA Cybersecurity Directorate's first full year of operation. [Read More]
Following the recent attack on the U.S. Capitol, where a parade of people stormed the building and gained access to unprotected computers, industry professionals share thoughts on what they would do if they were in charge of cybersecurity at an organization that could end up in a similar situation. [Read More]
The CSET bureau will focus on international cyberspace security and policy issues. [Read More]
Red Hat buys an innovative container security startup and announced plans to open-source the technology at a later date. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Risk Management

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AJ Nash's picture
For companies trying to build new or mature existing intelligence programs, the Age of COVID has been an excellent time to capture 30-60 minutes with that hard-to-find manager
Torsten George's picture
While the SolarWinds hack is not the first supply chain attack to make headlines, its sophistication and blast radius is forcing organizations to consider how they can minimize their exposure to these types of threats in the future.
AJ Nash's picture
As you build your cyber intelligence program – and have all the vendors lined up to take your money – don’t overlook the importance of investing in the right people.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Many security teams will have to reduce budget against projects scheduled for 2021, with funds being re-allocated to pandemic-related business and workforce enablement
Tim Bandos's picture
Keeping a ‘six foot distance’ between our digital home life and digital work life can go a long way when it comes to safeguarding our most sensitive data, too.
AJ Nash's picture
Knowing that threat intelligence is readily available and proving its worth is one thing, understanding how to use it within your security operations program is quite another.
Marc Solomon's picture
When intelligence becomes a capability and not just subscriptions to feeds, we can gain the full value of intelligence as the foundation to security operations.
Torsten George's picture
Today’s dynamic threatscape requires security professionals to adjust to an ever-expanding attack surface.
Derek Manky's picture
It’s amazing how foundational security principles, consistently implemented, can help defeat the craftiest attack vector.
John Maddison's picture
By understanding the latest threat trends, security teams can take measures to ensure that their security strategies, including the identification and tracking of new IOCs, are being correctly updated.