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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Facebook this week confirmed that it indeed knows when users access websites and apps that use Facebook services, even if they don’t have an account on the social network. [Read More]
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg testified for nearly 10 hours over two days on Facebook's privacy and data protection issues before committees of the Senate and House: [Read More]
In the United States there are practically no laws against the use of data from social media or search engines, but the Federal Trade Commission did sanction Facebook in 2011 for its handling of personal data. [Read More]
Mark Zuckerberg will appear before US lawmakers as a firestorm rocks Facebook over its data privacy scandal, with pressure mounting for new regulations on social media platforms. [Read More]
Facebook was aware more than two years ago of Cambridge Analytica's harvesting of the personal profiles of up to 87 million users and cannot rule out other cases of abuse of user data. [Read More]
Facebook said it is updating its terms on privacy and data sharing to give users a clearer picture of how the social network handles personal information. [Read More]
Facebook said personal data on as many as 87 million users was improperly shared with British political consultancy Cambridge Analytica. [Read More]
The question is whether Facebook and/or CA would have been in breach of GDPR were it already operational, and therefore whether GDPR will prevent any future repetitions of this sort. [Read More]
Chinese people and foreign firms are girding for a weekend deadline that will curb the use of unlicensed software to circumvent internet controls, as the government plugs holes in its "Great Firewall". [Read More]
Facebook has announced a series of changes to its developer platform to implement tighter user privacy controls and limit how apps can access to user data. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.
David Holmes's picture
The portion of encrypted traffic keeps rising, so IT security administrators will be forced to do more SSL decryption if they are to get any value at all out of their fancy security tools.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.