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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Amazon shareholders will get the opportunity to vote on two non-binding shareholders' resolutions concerning the Amazon Rekognition facial recognition system. [Read More]
Some of the top research universities in the US are cutting ties with Chinese tech giant Huawei as the company faces allegations of bank fraud and trade theft. [Read More]
Facebook has been asking users for their email passwords and telling them that their email address needed to be confirmed in order to update their contact information. [Read More]
Two companies exposed more than 540 million records containing information on Facebook users and their activities via unprotected AWS S3 buckets. [Read More]
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg's call for "globally harmonized" online regulation raises questions about how internet platforms can deal with concerns about misinformation and abusive content while remaining open to free speech. [Read More]
A second critical crypto vulnerability that can be exploited to hide vote manipulation has been discovered in the Swiss e-voting system. [Read More]
The Federal Emergency Management Agency wrongly released to a contractor the personal information of 2.3 million survivors of devastating 2017 hurricanes and wildfires, potentially exposing the victims to identity fraud and theft. [Read More]
D.C. Attorney General Karl A. Racine introduces the Security Breach Protection Amendment Act of 2019, a bill that aims to expand breach laws and enhance data security. [Read More]
The EU's anti-trust regulator is to slap tech giant Google with a new fine over unfair competition practices, according to reports. [Read More]
Chinese e-commerce giant Gearbest exposed user data through unprotected databases. The company has downplayed the incident and blamed it on an error made by a member of its security team. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.