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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A U.S. district judge has dismissed New Mexico’s privacy claims against Google over privacy concerns, but New Mexico’s top prosecutor vowed Monday to continue the legal fight to protect child privacy rights. [Read More]
TikTok is urging a federal court to block US President Donald Trump from banning the video app, arguing the move is motivated by election politics rather than legitimate national security concerns. [Read More]
Microsoft announced on Tuesday at its Ignite conference that it has extended its threat protection portfolio and it has unified some of its security solutions under the Microsoft Defender brand. [Read More]
A US judge on Sunday blocked the government's ban on WeChat downloads, hours before it was due to take effect in an ongoing technology and espionage battle between Washington and Beijing. [Read More]
Twitter is telling United States politicians, news outlets and journalists to take steps to ensure that their accounts are protected during the upcoming election. [Read More]
American tech giant Microsoft said Sunday its offer to buy TikTok was rejected, leaving Oracle as the sole remaining bidder ahead of the imminent deadline for the Chinese-owned video app to sell or shut down its US operations. [Read More]
Facebook may be forced to stop sending data about its European users to the U.S., in the first major fallout from a recent court ruling that found some trans-Atlantic data transfers don’t protect users from American government snooping. [Read More]
European Union privacy regulators are wrangling over the penalty Ireland’s data privacy watchdog was set to issue Twitter for a data breach, pushing back the case’s long awaited conclusion under the bloc’s tough new data privacy rules. [Read More]
TikTok has stepped up its defense against US accusations that the popular video app is a national security threat, denouncing what it called "rumors and misinformation" about its links to the Chinese government. [Read More]
The United States has fired a new salvo in its rivalry with China, ordering sweeping restrictions against Chinese-owned social media stars TikTok and WeChat. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Compliance

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Josh Lefkowitz's picture
Regardless of which framework you use, it’s crucial to operationalize it in the context of your organization’s unique environment and risk factors.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Mike Fleck's picture
Big companies can say they are GFPR compliant, but odds are their current structure will never allow them to find, identify, and categorize all the data that they have collected over time.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Despite the long ramp-up towards the GDPR compliance deadline, the effects of the new regulations are still very much in infancy.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Bradon Rogers's picture
Complying with GDPR was the immediate challenge, but now there is an opportunity to capture the good work that has been done and make data protection a top of mind focus for enterprises every day.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With domain name WHOIS data subject to the GDPR’s privacy requirements, the system will “go dark” until alternative preparations are made, creating a challenge for this who fight computer fraud and other criminal activity on the Internet.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Penalties for non-compliance with GDPR will be severe. For example, if your organization fails to report a data breach within 72 hours, expect a fine.