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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

An Israeli spyware company named in a Financial Times report on a WhatsApp security flaw prides itself on "rigorous, ethical standards" despite previous links to alleged espionage. [Read More]
Experts called on 5G providers Friday to heed supply chain security in light of concerns about technology providers such as China's Huawei, recently banned by the US government. [Read More]
The United States on Thursday urged "like-minded governments" from the European Union to be cautious and coordinate their policies on 5G network security in light of suspicions over the system proposed by Chinese giant Huawei. [Read More]
Chinese authorities are using a mobile app designed for mass surveillance to profile, investigate and detain Muslims in Xinjiang by labelling "completely lawful" behaviour as suspicious, a Human Rights Watch report said. [Read More]
Apple claims it recently removed several parental control applications from the App Store due to their use of “highly invasive” mobile device management (MDM) technology. [Read More]
British telecoms group Vodafone tackled a security flaw with Huawei technology a decade ago, it was revealed Tuesday amid widespread concerns over the Chinese giant developing 5G networks abroad. [Read More]
ImmuniWeb launches free online tool designed for testing websites, including PCI DSS compliance, CMS security, web server security, and privacy issues. [Read More]
Slack faces attacks launched by sophisticated cybercriminals and nation-state threat actors, the company said in a SEC filing ahead of going public. [Read More]
Canada’s privacy czar said Thursday that he is taking Facebook to court after finding that lax practices at the social media giant allowed personal information to be used for political purposes. [Read More]
British officials downplayed reports that Prime Minister Theresa May will allow China’s Huawei to supply parts of the U.K.’s new internet network, a decision that goes against U.S. pleas to ban the firm as it could help Beijing’s spying efforts. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Compliance

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Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Mike Fleck's picture
Big companies can say they are GFPR compliant, but odds are their current structure will never allow them to find, identify, and categorize all the data that they have collected over time.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Despite the long ramp-up towards the GDPR compliance deadline, the effects of the new regulations are still very much in infancy.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Bradon Rogers's picture
Complying with GDPR was the immediate challenge, but now there is an opportunity to capture the good work that has been done and make data protection a top of mind focus for enterprises every day.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With domain name WHOIS data subject to the GDPR’s privacy requirements, the system will “go dark” until alternative preparations are made, creating a challenge for this who fight computer fraud and other criminal activity on the Internet.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Penalties for non-compliance with GDPR will be severe. For example, if your organization fails to report a data breach within 72 hours, expect a fine.
Jalal Bouhdada's picture
Jalal Bouhdada, Founder and Principal ICS Security Consultant at Applied Risk, discusses the implications of the new EU Directive on Security of Network and Information Systems (NIS)