Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Remote conferencing services provider Zoom this week updated its privacy policy following the publishing of a series of reports raising concerns regarding the privacy of Zoom users. [Read More]
Apple this week announced that third-party cookies are now blocked by default in Safari on macOS, iOS and iPadOS. [Read More]
Senators this week introduced a bill aimed at banning the use of the China-made TikTok application on government devices. [Read More]
House lawmakers prepared to extend surveillance authorities that expire this month, releasing legislation that represents a rare bipartisan agreement after members of both parties said they wanted to ensure the tools preserved civil liberties. [Read More]
Facebook and other tech companies need to be regulated like the tobacco industry, warned Christopher Wylie, the whistleblower who exposed the Cambridge Analytica scandal. [Read More]
Australia's privacy watchdog announced legal action against Facebook Monday for alleged "systematic failures" exposing more than 300,000 Australians to a data breach by Cambridge Analytica. [Read More]
Facebook has sued domain registrar Namecheap over its refusal to provide information on tens of domains that impersonated the social media company. [Read More]
UK telecommunications and media company Virgin Media has exposed the personal information of roughly 900,000 people. [Read More]
US lawmakers propose legislation that could see internet companies held legally responsible for content on their platforms if they don't do enough to police child pornography. [Read More]
The UK Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has fined Hong Kong based Cathay Pacific Airways the maximum possible £500,000 ($646,000) following a long-running breach that occurred between October 2014 and May 2018. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Compliance

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Josh Lefkowitz's picture
Regardless of which framework you use, it’s crucial to operationalize it in the context of your organization’s unique environment and risk factors.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Mike Fleck's picture
Big companies can say they are GFPR compliant, but odds are their current structure will never allow them to find, identify, and categorize all the data that they have collected over time.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Despite the long ramp-up towards the GDPR compliance deadline, the effects of the new regulations are still very much in infancy.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Bradon Rogers's picture
Complying with GDPR was the immediate challenge, but now there is an opportunity to capture the good work that has been done and make data protection a top of mind focus for enterprises every day.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With domain name WHOIS data subject to the GDPR’s privacy requirements, the system will “go dark” until alternative preparations are made, creating a challenge for this who fight computer fraud and other criminal activity on the Internet.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Penalties for non-compliance with GDPR will be severe. For example, if your organization fails to report a data breach within 72 hours, expect a fine.