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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

On May 22, Zoom will share a draft of the cryptographic design it wants to use for its future end-to-end encryption feature. [Read More]
Facebook has agreed to pay a Can$9 million (US$6.5 million) fine for making false or misleading claims about its privacy settings, Canada's competition watchdog announced Tuesday. [Read More]
Privacy advocates warn that the danger of creating new government surveillance powers for the pandemic, including through contact tracing apps, could lead to much bigger problems in the future. [Read More]
Germany's foreign intelligence service violated the constitution by spying on internet data from foreigners abroad, the nation's top court ruled Tuesday in a victory for overseas journalists who brought the case. [Read More]
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg on Monday urged the European Union to take the lead in setting global standards for tech regulation or risk seeing countries follow China as a model. [Read More]
A coalition of consumer groups filed a complaint Thursday with US regulators claiming the popular video app TikTok has failed to live up to an agreement last year limiting data collection from children. [Read More]
New York state's top prosecutor announces that the company Zoom would improve security measures, after flaws were detected as the video conferencing platform soared in popularity amid the coronavirus pandemic. [Read More]
The Czech Republic and the United States have signed a joint declaration Wednesday for cooperating on security of 5G technology. [Read More]
As governments race to develop mobile tracing apps to help contain infections, attention is turning to how officials will ensure users’ privacy. [Read More]
New rules require critical information infrastructure operators in China to conduct cybersecurity reviews when purchasing tech products and services. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Compliance

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Josh Lefkowitz's picture
Regardless of which framework you use, it’s crucial to operationalize it in the context of your organization’s unique environment and risk factors.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Mike Fleck's picture
Big companies can say they are GFPR compliant, but odds are their current structure will never allow them to find, identify, and categorize all the data that they have collected over time.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Despite the long ramp-up towards the GDPR compliance deadline, the effects of the new regulations are still very much in infancy.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Bradon Rogers's picture
Complying with GDPR was the immediate challenge, but now there is an opportunity to capture the good work that has been done and make data protection a top of mind focus for enterprises every day.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With domain name WHOIS data subject to the GDPR’s privacy requirements, the system will “go dark” until alternative preparations are made, creating a challenge for this who fight computer fraud and other criminal activity on the Internet.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Penalties for non-compliance with GDPR will be severe. For example, if your organization fails to report a data breach within 72 hours, expect a fine.