Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

OpenSSL has evolved a great deal in terms of security since the disclosure of the Heartbleed vulnerability back in 2014. [Read More]
Mastercard has a team working on an initiative aiming to ensure a more sustained security even beyond the letter of the PCI compliance requirements. [Read More]
The European Commission said Monday it had begun a "preliminary investigation" into how Facebook and Google collect personal data and what they do with it. [Read More]
The DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) this week announced the release of an open source post-election auditing tool in preparation for the 2020 elections. [Read More]
California's attorney general accuses Facebook of failing to provide a slew of information subpoenaed in a probe of its privacy practices begun last year in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. [Read More]
Facebook says 100 third-party application developers continued to access user information via the Groups API even after access to the data was restricted. [Read More]
Proton Technologies, the company behind the privacy-focused email service ProtonMail, has made available the source code of its iOS client application. [Read More]
Dunkin' Donuts sued by New York's State Attorney General over data breaches that took place in 2015 and 2018. [Read More]
An analysis of Android flashlight apps available in Google Play reveals that they request an average of 25 permissions, with some requesting up to 77 permissions when installed. [Read More]
The Libra Association, the organization in charge of Facebook’s Libra cryptocurrency, has launched a public bug bounty program with rewards of up to $10,000. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Audits

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Marcus Ranum's picture
To communicate about our metrics, we need ways that we can ground our experience in terms of “normal” for us; Otherwise, we really can't communicate our metrics effectively with anyone who isn't in a similar environment.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Security is a creature of habit. Security likes things to stay the same. Change brings chaos. Chaos is bad for security. But, we can help control the security of our environment by following good security habits.
Gant Redmon's picture
A new amendment to Texas' breach notice law is designed to make it easier for Texas entities to comply with Texas law by giving those entities the choice of notifying under Texas law or the law of residents of other states.
Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
While regulations and ensuing IT audits go beyond firewalls and firewall policies, these devices are often a good place to start when it comes to becoming "audit-ready" and gaining continuous visibility of what's going on in your network.
Dr. Mike Lloyd's picture
Santa doesn’t care if you were naughty or nice on Christmas Eve – what matters is how you did all year. Security is much the same.
Steve Ragan's picture
For most CISOs, the pain of an audit is part of the job, but it doesn’t have to be the nightmare that most of the IT community envisions.
Jeff Hudson's picture
Too many IT and risk managers are surprised by security breaches, compromised keys or operational failures that occur from sheer neglect that result when you leave your valuable keys as exposed as a password on a post-it. Hefty, potential fines for failing to comply with regulations are risk enough, but the risks of ignoring these vulnerabilities extend even further.
Michael Goff's picture
The vast majority of ISVs are focused on prospecting and lead generation while overlooking potential sales funnel leakage due to piracy. Any vendor that is serious about its longevity needs to know if it has a software piracy problem.
Mike Lennon's picture
Enjoy this selection of top picks for 2010, listed in no particular order. Happy New Year!