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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Hackers breached Microsoft email services (Outlook.com, Hotmail, MSN) and accessed user accounts after compromising a support agent’s credentials. [Read More]
Using cryptography and virtual drop boxes, Julian Assange's WikiLeaks created a revolutionary new model for media to lure massive digitized leaks from whistleblowers, exposing everything from US military secrets to wealthy tax-dodgers' illicit offshore accounts. [Read More]
Russian lawmakers approve a bill that would allow Moscow to cut the country's internet traffic from foreign servers, in a key second reading paving the way for legislation that activists fear is a step towards online isolation. [Read More]
Amazon shareholders will get the opportunity to vote on two non-binding shareholders' resolutions concerning the Amazon Rekognition facial recognition system. [Read More]
A team of researchers has demonstrated that hackers can modify 3D medical scans to add or remove evidence of a serious illness, such as cancer. [Read More]
Some of the top research universities in the US are cutting ties with Chinese tech giant Huawei as the company faces allegations of bank fraud and trade theft. [Read More]
Facebook has been asking users for their email passwords and telling them that their email address needed to be confirmed in order to update their contact information. [Read More]
Two companies exposed more than 540 million records containing information on Facebook users and their activities via unprotected AWS S3 buckets. [Read More]
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg's call for "globally harmonized" online regulation raises questions about how internet platforms can deal with concerns about misinformation and abusive content while remaining open to free speech. [Read More]
Britain has identified "significant" issues in Huawei's engineering processes that pose "new risks" for the nation's telecommunications, a government report found Thursday amid lingering global suspicion over the Chinese technology giant. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Torsten George's picture
By implementing the core pillars of GDPR, organizations can assure they meet the mandate’s requirements while strengthening their cyber security posture.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.