Security Experts:

Mobile & Wireless
long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) system checklist was designed to help mitigate vulnerabilities and protect business environments. [Read More]
The newly discovered Android banking trojan targets international banks and five different cryptocurrency services. [Read More]
Mandiant researchers says narratives used in the Ghostwriter information operations campaign are aligned with Belarusian government interests, suggesting at least partial involvement. [Read More]
Cloudflare said the multi-vector distributed denial of service attack combined DNS amplification attacks and UDP floods and lasted just one minute. [Read More]
Chipmakers Intel and AMD release patches for multiple vulnerabilities in multiple products, including a series of high severity issues in software drivers. [Read More]
Adobe patches a security flaw in the RoboHelp Server product, warning that corporate environments are exposed to arbitrary code execution attacks. [Read More]
As cybersecurity valuations soar, Drata banks $100 million in a funding deal that values the company north of $1 billion. [Read More]
The cellphones of six Palestinian human rights activists were infected with spyware from the notorious Israeli hacker-for-hire company NSO Group as early as July 2020, a security researcher discovered. [Read More]
Security researchers spot signs that the Babuk ransomware gang is targeting ProxyShell vulnerabilities in Microsoft Exchange Server. [Read More]
Identified in the commercial Bluetooth Classic (BT) stacks, the vulnerabilities are believed to affect millions of devices. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

rss icon

Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.