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Mobile & Wireless
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The United States has fired a new salvo in its rivalry with China, ordering sweeping restrictions against Chinese-owned social media stars TikTok and WeChat. [Read More]
Researchers have discovered that devices using Wi-Fi chips from Qualcomm and MediaTek are vulnerable to Kr00k-like attacks. [Read More]
The US Senate voted to bar TikTok from being downloaded onto US government employees' telephones, intensifying US scrutiny of the popular Chinese-owned video app. [Read More]
Twitter has informed customers that a vulnerability in its Android app could have been exploited by malicious applications to access direct messages and other private data. [Read More]
Researchers analyzed DJI’s Pilot app for Android and found some security issues, but the Chinese drone giant says the claims are “misleading.” [Read More]
Google has patched over 50 vulnerabilities in the Android operating system with the August 2020 security updates. [Read More]
Microsoft will continue talks to acquire the US operations of popular video-sharing app TikTok, after meeting with President Donald Trump who seemingly backed off his earlier threats to ban the Chinese-owned platform. [Read More]
President Donald Trump said he will bar fast-growing social media app TikTok from the United States as American authorities have raised concerns the service could be a tool for Chinese intelligence. [Read More]
The US ambassador in Brasilia warned of "consequences" if Brazil chooses Chinese telecoms company Huawei to develop its 5G network. [Read More]
ZDI has announced the rules and prizes for Pwn2Own Tokyo 2020, where white hat hackers can earn tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars for vulnerabilities in smartphones and IoT devices. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.