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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Many developers who are creating applications for Apple's iOS do not use encryption in their software, [Read More]
Apple announces “Sign in with Apple,” a new authentication system advertised as fast, secure and privacy friendly, but some experts are skeptical. [Read More]
Researchers have devised a new proof-of-concept attack that targets the touchscreen of Near-Field Communication (NFC)-enabled mobile devices such as smartphones and allows remote control of the devices. [Read More]
Researchers at Cambridge University have determined that attackers could use the built-in motion sensors in mobile devices to generate a unique device fingerprint. [Read More]
Huawei has promised to continue delivering Android security updates to existing phones and tablets after Google suspended business with the Chinese company. [Read More]
Google is offering to replace Bluetooth Titan Security Keys for free after researchers at Microsoft discovered a misconfiguration that can be exploited to attack the devices. [Read More]
An Israeli spyware company named in a Financial Times report on a WhatsApp security flaw prides itself on "rigorous, ethical standards" despite previous links to alleged espionage. [Read More]
New Intel CPU vulnerabilities known as MDS, ZombieLoad, Fallout and RIDL impact millions of devices. Affected vendors published advisories and blog posts with information for users. [Read More]
Facebook patches a serious WhatsApp zero-day vulnerability (CVE-2019-3568) that can and has been exploited to remotely install spyware on phones by calling the targeted device. [Read More]
The United States has indicted nine individuals with online identity theft and related charges in connection with SIM Swapping attacks. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
Adam Ely's picture
The increase in mobile security conversations shows that teams are still trying to figure out their strategy and how to address this new landscape of vulnerabilities.