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Mobile & Wireless
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Thai activists involved in the country’s pro-democracy protests had their cell phones or other devices infected and attacked with government-sponsored spyware. [Read More]
Microsoft issues an urgent Patch Tuesday bulletin to warn of in-the-wild zero-day exploitation of a privilege escalation flaw in the Windows operating system. [Read More]
The European Central Bank said that its president, Christine Lagarde, was targeted in a hacking attempt but no information was compromised. [Read More]
News Analysis: Cybersecurity experts toss bouquets at Apple for removing attack surface from its flagship platforms and call on competing OS makers to match Cupertino’s attempts to neutralize the mercenary spyware business. [Read More]
Apple plans to add a new ‘Lockdown Mode’ that significantly reduces attack surface and adds technical roadblocks to limit sophisticated software exploits. [Read More]
Researchers at ReversingLabs and Checkmarx release separate warnings about software supply chain attacks targeting the open source NPM ecosystem. [Read More]
Cybersecurity startup oak9 has attracted new interest from venture capitalists with Cisco Investments and Morgan Stanley’s Next Level Fund joining a new $8 million funding round. [Read More]
A malicious application on the user’s phone could have stolen the Amazon access token from the Amazon Photos application. [Read More]
Normalyze closes a $22 million funding round as venture capitalists rush to place bets on the newly coined Data Security Posture Management (DSPM) space. [Read More]
Israeli startup Cyolo raises a massive Series B round to compete in the market for zero trust networking access. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.