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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Amid numerous malicious attacks leveraging the current COVID-19 coronavirus crisis, security researchers have discovered an Android surveillance campaign targeting users in Libya. [Read More]
NIST and DHS published a series of recommendations on how to ensure that virtual meetings and connections to enterprise networks are protected from prying eyes. [Read More]
Senators this week introduced a bill aimed at banning the use of the China-made TikTok application on government devices. [Read More]
A recently discovered Android Trojan was designed to gain root access on infected devices and hijack Facebook accounts by stealing cookies from the browser and the social media app. [Read More]
Google has announced that Android and macOS users can now use more web browsers to initially register security keys to their accounts. [Read More]
T-Mobile is sending notifications to its customers to inform them of a data breach that resulted in some of their personal information being compromised. [Read More]
Google’s March 2020 set of security patches for the Android operating system includes fixes for over 70 vulnerabilities, including a critical flaw in media framework. [Read More]
Threat actors linked to China increasingly targeted the telecommunications sector in 2019, according to endpoint security firm CrowdStrike. [Read More]
Although businesses are increasingly at risk for cyberattacks on their mobile devices, many aren’t taking steps to protect smartphones and tablets. [Read More]
Pharmacy store chain Walgreens has started informing some users of its mobile app that their personal information may have been exposed due to a bug. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.