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Mobile & Wireless
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Apple has published its latest transparency report, which provides details on the number of government requests the tech company received during the first half of 2019. [Read More]
Google has simplified the enrollment process for its Advanced Protection Program and it now allows users to activate a security key on their iPhone. [Read More]
Apple and the US government are at loggerheads for the second time in four years over unlocking iPhones connected to a mass shooting by Islamic extremists. [Read More]
Google Project Zero security researchers have published technical details on iMessage vulnerability (CVE-2019-8641) that could be exploited remotely to achieve arbitrary code execution. [Read More]
Dating apps Grindr, OkCupid and Tinder leak personal information to advertising companies in possible violation of European data privacy laws, a consumer group said in a report. [Read More]
Weak security measures in place at several major wireless carriers in the United States make it easy for attackers to perform SIM swap attacks on prepaid accounts, a recent study found. [Read More]
Google has removed 1,700 unique applications that were part of a family of potentially unwanted programs. [Read More]
A bill introduced by Senator Tom Cotton would ban the sharing of intelligence with countries that use Huawei technologies in their 5G networks. [Read More]
Pre-installed malware on Android phones is a growing menace -- so much that Privacy International and around 50 other NGOs (including ACLU, EFF, Amnesty and the TOR project) sent a letter to Google demanding a stop to the habit. [Read More]
The FBI asked Apple to help extract data from iPhones that belonged to the Saudi aviation student Mohammed Alshamrani, who fatally shot three sailors at a U.S. naval base in Florida. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.