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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The [email protected] Browser, the old technology that allows Simjacker attacks on mobile phones, is still deployed by 61 mobile operators across 29 countries. [Read More]
Two rights activists in Morocco have been targeted by surveillance technology developed by an Israeli firm that enables the sender to seize near-full control of mobile devices, says Amnesty International. [Read More]
Google’s October 2019 security patches for Android address a total of 26 vulnerabilities, including a couple of remote code execution bugs impacting Android 10. [Read More]
Developers of the secure messaging app Signal have rushed to patch a serious vulnerability that could have been exploited to eavesdrop on users without any interaction required. [Read More]
Fully patched Pixel 2 devices, even those running Android 10 preview, are impacted by a vulnerability that has already been abused in attacks, a Google researcher has discovered. [Read More]
Google is adding its Password Checkup tool to the Account password manager and Chrome, and it has unveiled some new privacy features for YouTube, Maps and Assistant. [Read More]
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo warned Italy Wednesday of China's "predatory approach" to trade and investment, but Rome insisted its special powers over 5G supply deals would protect it. [Read More]
Apple releases security updates for iOS 13 and iPadOS to address a vulnerability that allows third-party keyboard extensions to gain “full access” without being granted permission. [Read More]
Researcher releases Checkm8, an “unpatchable” iOS bootrom exploit that can be used to jailbreak iPhones between 4S and X. [Read More]
Another variant of the Simjacker SIM card attack has been disclosed by researchers and it could impact millions of mobile phones. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.