Security Experts:

Mobile & Wireless
long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Microsoft has warned users of a new and sophisticated Android ransomware that abuses notification services to display the ransom note. [Read More]
Google this week revealed that it’s working on redesigning the security alerts for Google Accounts and that it will make them available directly in the applications users are logged into. [Read More]
Google on Friday announced the Android Partner Vulnerability Initiative (APVI), an effort aimed at improving patching of security issues specific to Android OEMs. [Read More]
A vulnerability in Instagram allows an attacker to take over an Instagram account and turn the victim's phone into a spying tool by simply sending a malicious image by any media exchange platform. [Read More]
TikTok is urging a federal court to block US President Donald Trump from banning the video app, arguing the move is motivated by election politics rather than legitimate national security concerns. [Read More]
Experts have identified an unprotected Elasticsearch server that contained terabytes of data pertaining to users of Microsoft’s Bing mobile application. [Read More]
A vulnerability in Firefox for Android can be exploited to remotely open arbitrary websites on the targeted user’s phone without any interaction, malicious apps or MitM attacks. [Read More]
The Commerce Department will roll out a ban of transactions in the U.S. using TikTok and WeChat starting Sunday. [Read More]
Apple has patched nearly a dozen vulnerabilities and it has introduced new privacy features with the release of iOS 14 and iPadOS 14. [Read More]
Six European Union countries and the bloc’s executive Commission have begun testing a virtual “gateway” to ensure national coronavirus tracing apps can work across borders. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

rss icon

Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.