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Mobile & Wireless
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Google and ARM aim to mitigate memory safety bugs in Android with a new hardware feature called memory tagging extension (MTE). [Read More]
As mobile devices have become more deeply embedded in everybody's life, and the amalgamation of personal data on devices has grown, so has the attraction of the mobile device increased for both cyber criminals and nation-state attackers. [Read More]
Google's Android Enterprise has received ISO 27001 security certification. [Read More]
Mobile security firm Lookout has discovered a new set of sophisticated custom Android surveillanceware tools developed and distributed by a Russian-based company. [Read More]
The U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has released an infographic underlining some of the risk factors associated with 5G wireless networks. [Read More]
Poland and Lithuania are looking into the potential security risks of using a Russian-made face-editing app that has triggered a viral social media trend where users post "aged" selfies. [Read More]
Russian-made FaceApp, which allows users to see how they will look as they age, found itself in the eye of a political storm in the US Wednesday, with one senator urging an FBI investigation into its "national security and privacy risks". [Read More]
Hackers can manipulate media files transferred by users via WhatsApp and Telegram due to the way Android allows apps to access files on a device’s external storage. [Read More]
Apple disabled the Walkie-Talkie app on the Apple Watch after learning of a serious vulnerability that can be exploited to eavesdrop via another user’s iPhone. [Read More]
Two related servers were recently found hosting 17,490 samples of the Anubis Android malware, Trend Micro’s security researchers say. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
Adam Ely's picture
The increase in mobile security conversations shows that teams are still trying to figure out their strategy and how to address this new landscape of vulnerabilities.