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Mobile & Wireless
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The FTC alleged that Fandango and Credit Karma both disabled the SSL certificate validation process in mobile apps, making them vulnerable to Man-in-the-Middle attacks.
Researchers say the Coinkrypt malware infects Google Android phones to mine cryptocurrencies such as Dogecoin.
Russian government officials have swapped their iPads for Samsung tablets to ensure tighter security, the telecoms minister told news agencies.
BlackBerry announced that its Secure Work Space for iOS and Android has been FIPS 140-2 certified.
Research in the International Journal of Information and Computer Security discusses deauthentication and brute force attacks on WPA2.
ATM maker Diebold has deployed the world's first ATM that that relies solely on mobile authentication and has no card reader or PIN pad.
The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has the tricky task of protecting consumer privacy in the age of Big Data and ubiquitous data collection without stifling innovation, a deputy director with the agency said at a conference this week.
The National Security Agency has technology capable of recording all the phone calls of an entire country and replaying them later, a report based on leaked documents from Edward Snowden said.
Mobile security firm Lookout has appointed Jim Dolce as the CEO of the company, replacing Founder John Hering.
A report from Trend Micro goes inside a thriving market for goods and services aimed at compromising and scamming smartphone users.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Danelle Au's picture
Enterprises must find the right balance to deliver a mobile security environment that meets productivity and flexibility needs without putting devices, apps, or data at risk.
Ryan Naraine's picture
In this podcast, Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel in the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, talks about the new Microsoft Cybercrime Center and the ongoing battle to stop the proliferation of botnets around the world.
Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Security is a creature of habit. Security likes things to stay the same. Change brings chaos. Chaos is bad for security. But, we can help control the security of our environment by following good security habits.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.