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F5 Networks Launches IP Intelligence Service

F5 Networks has launched a cloud-based service that will detect and stop IP addresses associated with malicious activities from accessing the network. Powered by Webroot’s IP Reputation Service and integrated into F5's Traffic Management Operating System (TMOS), F5’s newest offering is designed to merge with their other subscription-based solutions.

By intelligently evaluating the reputation of Internet hosts, the company explains, the IP Intelligent Service prevents attackers from stealing data, compromising corporate resources, or otherwise disrupting business functions. The service does this by denying access to IP addresses known to be infected with malware, or those known to be in contact with malware distribution points, as well as general IP pools with low reputations.

F5 NetworksActive IP addresses offering or distributing malware, shell code, rootkits, worms, or viruses are also denied access. Given that DDoS attacks and some SQL Injection attacks are automated with bots, assuming they are leveraging known IP addresses, they tool will be thwarted.

However, in order to gain the most advantage, F5 points out that customers using their “BIG-IP Application Security Manager” and “iRules” technologies will see the most advantage.

“Organizations are looking for security solutions that can dynamically synthesize information from a variety of sources to give infrastructures the maximum level of protection against sophisticated cyber attacks,” said Mark Vondemkamp, Sr. Director, Product Management, Security at F5. “At the same time, enterprises must preserve the flexibility to customize their systems and add safeguards as network and access conditions change, and as new types of threats emerge.”

F5’s IP Intelligence service isavailable now with BIG-IP version 11.2 software. More information is available here

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Steve Ragan is a security reporter and contributor for SecurityWeek. Prior to joining the journalism world in 2005, he spent 15 years as a freelance IT contractor focused on endpoint security and security training.