Security Experts:

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The Anonymous internet hacking network declared war on the Islamic State group in a Youtube video Monday, vowing vengeance for attacks in Paris that left 129 dead and hundreds injured.
Hacking back, whether as part of an active defense strategy or a threat intelligence effort, is a controversial practice that many security firms and experts officially advise against. Industry professionals comment on the impact and implications of hacking back.
Researchers at Check Point hacked infrastructure used by the Iran-linked APT Rocket Kitten to identify victims and the group's developers.
ProtonMail suspects that recent DDoS attacks against its infrastructure are state-sponsored, mainly due to their magnitude and sophistication.
Hackers breached the systems of anti-adblocking service PageFair and used the access to deliver malware
US Defense Secretary Ashton Carter and his South Korean counterpart discussed their concerns over a growing list of threats from North Korea, including nuclear tests and computer hacking.
The personal laptop of a department chief in the German chancellery onto which a spying virus known as "Regin" was allegedly installed.
The Russia-linked threat group known as Pawn Storm has targeted organizations investigating the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17.
Threat actors associated with the Chinese government continue to target private U.S. firms even after the two countries agreed to stop cyber-enabled IP theft.
Facebook has announced a new measure meant to improve the security of user accounts, saying that it has begun notifying users on suspected account compromise.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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James McFarlin's picture
If there were any lingering doubts that cybersecurity is a geopolitical issue with global implications, such opinions were cast on the rocks by discussions this past week at the 2015 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
James McFarlin's picture
Does a dangerous threat lie with ISIS’s possible use of cyber weapons against American critical infrastructure, financial system or other targets? Will such attacks be attempted and do the capabilities exist within ISIS to do so?
James McFarlin's picture
Creative disruption, where a paradigm shift in thinking replaces an existing order, may be an elusive concept but its power as a driving force of human behavior cannot be denied.
James McFarlin's picture
One can only hope our nation’s alarm clocks wake up and stir our national leaders’ imaginations before a cyber incident of the magnitude of 9/11 results in the need for a “Cyber Strikes Commission Report.”
Tal Be'ery's picture
Defenders should use their "Strategic Depth" to mitigate attacks not on the perimeter but deeper within their network where they can leverage on their strategic advantage.
Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.
Eric Knapp's picture
Enemy infrastructure is and always has been an important military target. The difference is that with increasingly automated and connected infrastructure, the ability for an enemy to target these systems digitally has increased, putting these systems at greater risk.
Mark Hatton's picture
I believe that no other nation can match the capabilities of the United States military, but at the same time, matching the level of resources and investment in cyber being made by nation states such as China could prove impossible.
Danelle Au's picture
The building blocks for a robust cybersecurity strategy are not uniquely different from security requirements for a traditional enterprise...