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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The Ukrainian presidency said its website had been attacked by Russia in apparent retaliation for Kiev's decision to block prominent Moscow-based social networks. [Read More]
Shadow Brokers are back with a new offer: pay a monthly fee and receive exploits, and data from SWIFT/banks and nuclear programs [Read More]
Industry professionals react to WannaCry ransomware attacks, including ICS, insurance, legal, cybersecurity strategy and attribution aspects of the story [Read More]
An earlier WannaCry ransomware sample shows code similarities with malware used by a North Korea-linked hacking group responsible for multiple financial and destructive attacks, security researchers say. [Read More]
More cyberattacks could be in the pipeline after the global havoc caused by the Wannacry ransomware, South Korean cybersecurity experts warned Tuesday as fingers pointed at the North. [Read More]
Baijiu is a newly detected stealthy threat that currently targets North Korea, and seems to have Chinese provenance. It is delivered by phishing, and comprises a downloader that is being called Typhoon together with a set of backdoors being called Lionrock. [Read More]
The United States Intelligence Community published its 2017 assessment of threats to US national security, noting that Cyber threats pose an increasing risk to public health, safety, and prosperity as cyber technologies are integrated with critical infrastructure in key sectors. [Read More]
Industry experts comment on the implications of U.S. President Donald Trump’s executive order on cybersecurity [Read More]
Six top US intelligence officials told Congress Thursday they agree with the conclusion that Russia acted to influence last year's election, countering President Donald Trump's assertions that the hacking remains an open question. [Read More]
Who did hack Macron? The obvious conclusion is Russia; because Russia would benefit most from a Le Pen victory. But the timing of the document leaks was far too late to benefit Le Pen, and would more likely benefit Macron. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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Josh Lefkowitz's picture
It’s critical to recognize that there will always be virtual ways in which terrorists and other criminals can create threats that no border process or physical security program can stop.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Thomas Rid, Professor in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, joins the podcast to discuss the lack of nuance in the crypto debate and the future of global cyber conflict.
James McFarlin's picture
If there were any lingering doubts that cybersecurity is a geopolitical issue with global implications, such opinions were cast on the rocks by discussions this past week at the 2015 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
James McFarlin's picture
Does a dangerous threat lie with ISIS’s possible use of cyber weapons against American critical infrastructure, financial system or other targets? Will such attacks be attempted and do the capabilities exist within ISIS to do so?
James McFarlin's picture
Creative disruption, where a paradigm shift in thinking replaces an existing order, may be an elusive concept but its power as a driving force of human behavior cannot be denied.
James McFarlin's picture
One can only hope our nation’s alarm clocks wake up and stir our national leaders’ imaginations before a cyber incident of the magnitude of 9/11 results in the need for a “Cyber Strikes Commission Report.”
Tal Be'ery's picture
Defenders should use their "Strategic Depth" to mitigate attacks not on the perimeter but deeper within their network where they can leverage on their strategic advantage.
Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.
Eric Knapp's picture
Enemy infrastructure is and always has been an important military target. The difference is that with increasingly automated and connected infrastructure, the ability for an enemy to target these systems digitally has increased, putting these systems at greater risk.