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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The US tech industry is weathering a crisis of confidence over data protection and a difficult geopolitical situation, with record sales expected in 2019, say organizers of the Consumer Electronics Show. [Read More]
Hundreds of thousands of users ended up with spyware on their devices after downloading seemingly legitimate applications from Google Play, Trend Micro security researchers have discovered. [Read More]
A vulnerability in Skype for Android allows a hacker to bypass the phone’s lockscreen and view photos and contacts, and even open links in the browser. [Read More]
USB Implementers Forum announces new USB Type-C authentication protocol designed to protect host systems against non-compliant chargers and malicious devices. [Read More]
The latest iteration of Android 9 brings along a great deal of security improvements, including better encryption and authentication, keeping user data secure, and more, Google says. [Read More]
Huawei defends its global ambitions and network security in the face of Western fears that the Chinese telecom giant could serve as a Trojan horse for Beijing's security apparatus. [Read More]
A Czech cyber-security agency on Monday warned against using the software and hardware of China's Huawei and ZTE companies, saying they posed a threat to state security. [Read More]
Germany's IT watchdog has expressed scepticism about calls for a boycott of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, saying it has seen no evidence the firm could use its equipment to spy for Beijing. [Read More]
Security-minded Android application developers can better secure user data, thanks to new cryptographic features in Android 9.0, Google says. [Read More]
The European Union and its citizens should be "worried" about telecoms giant Huawei and other Chinese firms that cooperate with Beijing's intelligence services, official warns. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.
Adam Ely's picture
The mobile strategist will play a pivotal role in mobile integration, as they pave the way for the organizations to do so purposefully and securely.