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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

US authorities have demanded information from online payment service PayPal as part of a money laundering investigation, according to a regulatory filing available on Wednesday. [Read More]
InterContinental has confirmed that its payment card processing systems have been breached - 12 hotels in the Americas region are affected [Read More]
55-year-old man from Brooklyn, New York, pleads guilty to role in international cybercrime operation that caused losses of $1.2 million [Read More]
In 2016, 15.4 million U.S. consumers became identity fraud victims, a 16% increase over the previous year, according to a recent Javelin Strategy & Research study. [Read More]
Cybercriminals are increasingly using dark web forums to recruit insiders that can help them make a profit [Read More]
A new service named Ripper helps cybercriminals quickly identify fraudsters on underground marketplaces [Read More]
The popular darknet marketplace AlphaBay was until recently affected by a vulnerability that exposed its users’ private messages [Read More]
Western Union admits failing to maintain anti-money laundering program and facilitating wire fraud, and agrees to pay $586 million to settle charges [Read More]
The number of data breaches disclosed in the United States increased by 40 percent in 2016 compared to the previous year, said ITRC and CyberScout [Read More]
24-year-old man from North Carolina pleads guilty to hacking the online accounts of U.S. government officials [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Fraud & Identity Theft

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Torsten George's picture
While effective at curbing “petty crimes” such as credit skimming / cloning, EMV does not address more sophisticated cyber-attacks that target backend systems which contain card holders’ most sensitive information.
James Foster's picture
Many fraudulent accounts are mere satire or innocuous trolling, but others are created with far more devious intentions.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Social engineering attacks can happen at any time. Here are some strategies you can use to help reduce the chances of a successful social engineering/phishing attack you or your organization.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.
Gant Redmon's picture
When it comes to cybercrime, the police really can’t and aren’t going to protect residents of your town. The same goes for all towns and cities. Unless you’re talking a high six-figure theft, it's unlikely an officer will be assigned to your case.
Gant Redmon's picture
The holiday season is a time of giving. But savvy security and technology professionals such as yourselves know, both during the holidays and year-round, that not all giving is good.
Alan Wlasuk's picture
No more fertile ground for security breaches exists in the United States than our colleges and universities. A higher education student database is an identity thief’s dream come true.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Cooperation in the underground economy could enable a fraudster in Russia who masters the art of phishing to team up with another fraudster who already has the infrastructure of cashing out compromised online banking accounts of US banks.
Noa Bar-Yosef's picture
Companies are increasingly seeing the benefits of using social technologies both for internal and external purposes. What is the security impact of this trend? What should security teams think about?
Idan Aharoni's picture
To maximize profits, fraudsters need to do a lot of learning. They can either learn techniques of areas they haven't focused on yet, learn better techniques in the field they already specialize in, or learn new cover stories to improve the techniques they already use.