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Virus & Malware
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UK officially accuses the Russian government of being behind the NotPetya attack, which cost major organizations millions [Read More]
A newly discovered variant of the AndroRAT mobile malware can inject root exploits to perform malicious tasks [Read More]
Cryptocurrency mining malware is not uncommon on industrial systems, according to several cybersecurity firms [Read More]
Decryption keys for a current version of Cryakl ransomware have been obtained and uploaded to the NoMoreRansom website [Read More]
Researchers develop malware that can jump air gaps and exfiltrate data from an isolated device using magnetic fields [Read More]
Malware and phishing attacks growingly abuse SSL to increase their chances of success, Zscaler said in its latest report [Read More]
Europol and UK’s NCA announced that users and sellers of the LuminosityLink RAT have been targeted in an operation involving over a dozen law enforcement agencies [Read More]
South Korea’s Internet & Security Agency issues alert for Adobe Flash Player zero-day vulnerability reportedly exploited in attacks by North Korea [Read More]
Researchers find more than 130 malware samples exploiting the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities, including malware for Windows, Linux, macOS and browsers [Read More]
Danish shipping giant Maersk revealed that it had to restore nearly 50,000 PCs and servers following the NotPetya attack [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Malware

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Zeus 2.1 now boasts features that help it avoid analysis and hostile takeover from law enforcement, researchers, or competing cybercriminal organizations.
David Harley's picture
David Harley chimes in with some thoughts on the latest developments from the AMTSO and the Anti-Malware Industry.
David Harley's picture
The vulnerability in Windows Shell’s parsing of .LNK (shortcut) files presents some interesting and novel features in terms of its media lifecycle as well as its evolution from zero-day to patched vulnerability. For most of us, the vulnerability first came to light in the context of Win32/Stuxnet, malware that in itself presents some notable quirks.
David Harley's picture
The anti-malware industry sometimes sees more complicated problems than you might imagine, and they can’t all be fixed by tweaking detection algorithms or giving the marketing team a productivity bonus.
Mike Lennon's picture
Malvertising - Popular websites, blogs, and ad networks are fast becoming the preferred means of cybercriminals, identity thieves, and hackers to steal consumer information and distribute malicious content.
Markus Jakobsson's picture
Anti-virus products scan for malware in two ways. They look for sequences of bits that are found in programs that are known to be “evil” (but which are not commonly found in “good” programs)...