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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

New malware named Chalubo is targeting IoT devices to ensnare them into a DDoS botnet [Read More]
The development of the Triton/Trisis ICS malware was supported by a research institute backed by the Russian government, FireEye says [Read More]
Kaspersky Lab researchers have analyzed DarkPulsar, another exploit supposedly stolen from the NSA-linked Equation Group [Read More]
A China-linked cyber espionage group known as Tick was observed using the Datper malware in a recent campaign [Read More]
A cyber espionage group named GreyEnergy, linked by researchers to Russia's BlackEnergy, has been targeting energy and transportation companies in Ukraine and other countries [Read More]
A newly discovered infection campaign is leveraging malicious RTF files to deliver information-stealing Trojans without being detected [Read More]
A Russia-linked threat group tracked as DustSquad and Nomadic Octopus has been targeting diplomatic entities in Central Asia [Read More]
Cybersecurity agencies in the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand release joint report on publicly available hacking tools [Read More]
Hackers exploit the Drupal vulnerability known as Drupalgeddon2 to install a backdoor on compromised servers [Read More]
A new piece of malware named Exaramel provides evidence that the Industroyer/Crashoverride malware used in the 2016 Ukraine power outage is linked to NotPetya [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Malware

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Zeus 2.1 now boasts features that help it avoid analysis and hostile takeover from law enforcement, researchers, or competing cybercriminal organizations.
David Harley's picture
David Harley chimes in with some thoughts on the latest developments from the AMTSO and the Anti-Malware Industry.
David Harley's picture
The vulnerability in Windows Shell’s parsing of .LNK (shortcut) files presents some interesting and novel features in terms of its media lifecycle as well as its evolution from zero-day to patched vulnerability. For most of us, the vulnerability first came to light in the context of Win32/Stuxnet, malware that in itself presents some notable quirks.
David Harley's picture
The anti-malware industry sometimes sees more complicated problems than you might imagine, and they can’t all be fixed by tweaking detection algorithms or giving the marketing team a productivity bonus.
Mike Lennon's picture
Malvertising - Popular websites, blogs, and ad networks are fast becoming the preferred means of cybercriminals, identity thieves, and hackers to steal consumer information and distribute malicious content.
Markus Jakobsson's picture
Anti-virus products scan for malware in two ways. They look for sequences of bits that are found in programs that are known to be “evil” (but which are not commonly found in “good” programs)...