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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The threat actor behind the DNSpionage campaign has switched to new malware in attacks observed earlier this month. [Read More]
A financially motivated threat actor believed to speak Russian has used remote access Trojans (RATs) in attacks on financial entities in the United States and worldwide. [Read More]
Hackers scrambled to erase their digital footprints after FireEye linked the Triton/Trisis malware to a Russian government research institute. [Read More]
Iran-linked cyber-espionage group OilRig is making broad use of DNS tunneling across its tools portfolio, Palo Alto Networks security researchers reveal. [Read More]
The Scranos rootkit-enabled spyware operation has expanded reach outside of China to hit targets worldwide. [Read More]
A new variant of the HawkEye keylogger/information stealer is being leveraged in ongoing malware distribution campaigns. [Read More]
FireEye releases an open source tool designed to automate the analysis of Adobe Flash files to identify malware and prevent infections. [Read More]
A recently patched Windows zero-day vulnerability tracked as CVE-2019-0859 had been exploited to deliver a PowerShell backdoor. [Read More]
Feedback Friday: Industry professionals comment on the news that the group behind the Triton/Trisis malware has hit an additional critical infrastructure facility. [Read More]
Kaspersky publishes new report on the activities of the Hamas-linked Gaza Cybergang and claims much of its infrastructure has been disrupted. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Malware

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Zeus 2.1 now boasts features that help it avoid analysis and hostile takeover from law enforcement, researchers, or competing cybercriminal organizations.
David Harley's picture
David Harley chimes in with some thoughts on the latest developments from the AMTSO and the Anti-Malware Industry.
David Harley's picture
The vulnerability in Windows Shell’s parsing of .LNK (shortcut) files presents some interesting and novel features in terms of its media lifecycle as well as its evolution from zero-day to patched vulnerability. For most of us, the vulnerability first came to light in the context of Win32/Stuxnet, malware that in itself presents some notable quirks.
David Harley's picture
The anti-malware industry sometimes sees more complicated problems than you might imagine, and they can’t all be fixed by tweaking detection algorithms or giving the marketing team a productivity bonus.
Mike Lennon's picture
Malvertising - Popular websites, blogs, and ad networks are fast becoming the preferred means of cybercriminals, identity thieves, and hackers to steal consumer information and distribute malicious content.
Markus Jakobsson's picture
Anti-virus products scan for malware in two ways. They look for sequences of bits that are found in programs that are known to be “evil” (but which are not commonly found in “good” programs)...