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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Axonius emerges from stealth mode with a platform that leverages existing security and management tools to provide complete visibility and help secure devices [Read More]
McAfee unveiled a new version of the Enterprise Security Manager (ESM 11), and enhancements to its Behavioral Analytics, Investigator, Advanced Threat Defense, and Active Response products. [Read More]
An increasing number of researchers confirm existence of vulnerabilities in AMD processors, but no impact on the chip giant’s stock [Read More]
Russia-linked cyberspy group Dragonfly compromised a Cisco router and abused it to harvest credentials later used to hack energy companies in the UK [Read More]
Microcode patches for Spectre are available for all Intel CPUs launched in the past five years. The company provided more details on future processors that will include protections against these types of attacks [Read More]
New samples of Hacking Team’s Remote Control System (RCS) flagship spyware have recently emerged, slightly different from previously observed variations, ESET warns. [Read More]
Researchers showed how Cortana could have been abused to bypass the Windows lock screen and hack into enterprise systems. Microsoft released a patch, but variations of the attack may still be possible and other voice assistants could also be affected [Read More]
Researcher shows how much personal data is stored in web browsers and how readily it can be harvested [Read More]
Intel has released firmware updates for more processors to patch the Spectre vulnerability [Read More]
Google is stepping up its Internet of Things (IoT) game as it has entered into an agreement to acquire Xively, a division of LogMeIn, Inc. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Endpoint Security

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Mike Lennon's picture
For the past several years, enterprise security leaders have been challenged with the task of locking down endpoints with traditional security solutions that are proving to be ineffective against todays threats.
Simon Crosby's picture
Attackers return again and again to vulnerable components like Flash because they can keep tapping into perennial vulnerabilities.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Simon Crosby's picture
While data breaches aren’t going away anytime soon, every company has a choice of how they prepare for them. By focusing on the endpoint, businesses can better secure themselves with less cost and less time expended by the IT team.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Was the Mayan Apocalypse was a myth? Since I am a security geek, I just happen to talk about security a lot. What are some security myths I have heard in my conversations with some very bright people?
Shaun Donaldson's picture
Virtualized end-user systems and public cloud computing will play a role in nearly every business over the next decade, but applying the disposable philosophy universally in an enterprise environment is beyond risky, when you consider how attacks have changed.
Alan Wlasuk's picture
I made a mistake the other day, a horrible mistake. I let my kid use my computer. My once perfect computer now has a life of its own, a malware bot that nests firmly in a place that I can’t see.
Michael Goff's picture
About 50 percent of all software piracy violations found at corporations happen from businesses that are already clients of the software they are accused of stealing. So, what steps should both the software vendor and their customers take to ensure the relationship avoids speed bumps such as software piracy?
Alan Wlasuk's picture
While our attention is immediately drawn to the Internet when we think about the benign-turned-evil Matrix, a more interesting comparison can be made to the current Internet plague of botnets.
Robert Vamosi's picture
Laptop batteries use microcontrollers to tell the lithium battery when it's full and when it needs to be recharged. What's intriguing is that cybercriminals could install malware that would remain on the device no matter how many times you reinstalled the operating system.