Security Experts:

User Data Possibly Stolen in Scrum.org Hack

Scrum.org informed users on Tuesday that their account information might have been compromised after hackers exploited a new vulnerability in third party software used to operate the website.

Scrum.org provides training, assessment and certifications for the Scrum agile software development framework. The organization warned users via email that their usernames, email addresses, encrypted passwords, password decryption keys, certification information, and profile pictures might have been stolen by malicious actors.

The passwords for all Scrum.org accounts have been reset, although there is no evidence that the attacker has actually stolen or misued any of the exposed information. The organization also pointed out that the incident did not involve any financial details, and that no other information is stored on its servers. It’s unclear how many users are affected by the breach.

The data breach came to light on May 26, when Scrum.org noticed that its outgoing mail server was not sending emails with initial passwords. Further investigation revealed that someone had created a new admin account on the mail server and modified its settings.

The next day, the organization was informed by one of its vendors that a piece of software used to operate Scrum.org was plagued by a newly discovered flaw that can be exploited to conduct the malicious activities observed during the attack.

The vulnerability was patched by Scrum.org and the malicious admin account was removed. User passwords have been reset and the website has promised to move to a different software vendor this summer — one that provides better password security.

Scrum.org resets passwords

SecurityWeek has reached out to Scrum.org to find out what piece of software has been exploited and if the vulnerability was a zero-day at the time of the attack.

Dave West, CEO of Scrum.org, noted in the email sent out to customers that the investigation into this matter is ongoing.

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Eduard Kovacs (@EduardKovacs) is a contributing editor at SecurityWeek. He worked as a high school IT teacher for two years before starting a career in journalism as Softpedia’s security news reporter. Eduard holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial informatics and a master’s degree in computer techniques applied in electrical engineering.