Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

SecurityWeekSecurityWeek

Cybercrime

Russia Hacked Olympics Computers, Turned Blame on North Korea: Report

Russian military spies hacked hundreds of computers used by Winter Olympics organizers and tried to make it look like the work of North Korea, the Washington Post reported Sunday, quoting US intelligence sources.

Russian military spies hacked hundreds of computers used by Winter Olympics organizers and tried to make it look like the work of North Korea, the Washington Post reported Sunday, quoting US intelligence sources.

South Korea had previously announced that it was investigating the failure of several Olympic-linked internet sites and broadcast systems just as the opening ceremonies were taking place on February 9.

The Post reported that Russia’s GRU military intelligence agency managed to take control in early February of 300 computers linked to the Olympic organization. 

As a result, many attendees were unable to print their tickets for the ceremony, leaving empty seats.

It said the Russians had hacked South Korean computer routers and inserted a form of “malware” that allowed them to gather data and paralyze the network.

The Russians used a North Korean internet provider to make it appear the attack originated in North Korea, in what is known as a “false flag” operation, the Post said.

While American officials quoted in the article were unable to say whether the hackers had activated the malware, they said the cyber attack against the Games — from which Russia’s team was excluded for doping — was worrisome. 

Some analysts believe the cyber attack was retribution for that ban. Some Russian athletes were allowed to compete, but only under the designation of “Olympic Athletes from Russia.” 

Advertisement. Scroll to continue reading.

The Winter Games saw dramatic gestures aimed at easing the raw tensions dividing the two Koreas, as both countries’ athletes marched together during the opening ceremonies, and they fielded a single women’s ice hockey team. 

The sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un made several high-profile appearances in the early days of the Games, and a large squad of North Korean cheerleaders drew intense interest.  

Finally, at the Games’ closing ceremony Sunday, South Korean President Moon Jae-in and North Korean General Kim Yong Chol — a man considered a “war criminal” by many in the South for his role in two deadly attacks on Southern targets — exchanged a very public handshake.

Related: Russian Cyberspies Accused of Attack on Olympics Anti-Doping Agency

Written By

AFP 2023

Click to comment

Trending

Daily Briefing Newsletter

Subscribe to the SecurityWeek Email Briefing to stay informed on the latest threats, trends, and technology, along with insightful columns from industry experts.

Gain valuable insights from industry professionals who will help guide you through the intricacies of industrial cybersecurity.

Register

Join us for an in depth exploration of the critical nature of software and vendor supply chain security issues with a focus on understanding how attacks against identity infrastructure come with major cascading effects.

Register

Expert Insights

Related Content

Cybercrime

The changing nature of what we still generally call ransomware will continue through 2023, driven by three primary conditions.

Cybercrime

As it evolves, web3 will contain and increase all the security issues of web2 – and perhaps add a few more.

Cybercrime

A recently disclosed vBulletin vulnerability, which had a zero-day status for roughly two days last week, was exploited in a hacker attack targeting the...

Cybercrime

Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus Group informed some customers last week that their online accounts had been breached by hackers.

Cybercrime

Zendesk is informing customers about a data breach that started with an SMS phishing campaign targeting the company’s employees.

Artificial Intelligence

The release of OpenAI’s ChatGPT in late 2022 has demonstrated the potential of AI for both good and bad.

Cybercrime

Satellite TV giant Dish Network confirmed that a recent outage was the result of a cyberattack and admitted that data was stolen.

Cybercrime

Patch Tuesday: Microsoft calls attention to a series of zero-day remote code execution attacks hitting its Office productivity suite.