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Retired US General Probed for Alleged Stuxnet Leak: Report

WASHINGTON – A former high-ranking US military officer is being probed for allegedly leaking details about a US cyberattack on Iran, a US media report said Thursday.

WASHINGTON – A former high-ranking US military officer is being probed for allegedly leaking details about a US cyberattack on Iran, a US media report said Thursday.

Citing unnamed legal sources, NBC News said retired Marine Gen. James Cartwright has been told he is under investigation for allegedly disclosing details about the Stuxnet attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities.

Cartwright, 63, is the former vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The four-star general retired from the military in August 2011.

Stuxnet, tailored specifically to target Iran’s uranium enrichment operation, struck Iran in 2010 and reportedly dealt a serious blow to its disputed nuclear program.

In its report, NBC referenced a New York Times story published last year that mentioned Cartwright. The story also said the National Security Agency had developed Stuxnet in tandem with the Israelis.

Tehran is at odds with Washington and its allies who fear Iran’s nuclear activity is aimed at developing atomic weapons. But Iran insists its program is solely for peaceful purposes.

NBC News, again citing unnamed legal sources, said an original FBI investigation into the Stuxnet leak had focused on a possible White House source. By last year however, agents were honing on on Cartwright, it added.

The Justice Department did not immediately respond to an AFP request for comment. NBC News quoted Cartwright’s attorney, former White House counsel Greg Craig, as saying he had no comment.

Related: Stuxnet Likely Constituted Illegal Act of Force, Study Says

RelatedObama Ordered Use of Stuxnet, Acceleration of Cyber Attacks Against Iran

Podcast: Boldizar Bencsath of CrySyS Lab and Kaspersky’s Costin Raiu Discuss Stuxnet 0.5

Written By

AFP 2023

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