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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Bitmessage developers rush to patch remote code execution vulnerability in PyBitmessage in response to a zero-day attack [Read More]
A zero-day vulnerability impacting Telegram Messenger’s Windows client had been exploited in malicious attacks for months before being discovered and addressed. [Read More]
Seagate and RackTop join forces to launch a secure data storage product designed to help government organizations address cybersecurity and compliance challenges [Read More]
Mozilla announces intention to restrict the AppCache mechanism to secure connections in Firefox and other major web browser vendors plan on doing the same [Read More]
Two more misconfigured databases exposing the personal details of thousands of people were disclosed late last week [Read More]
Senator who conducted 4-month investigation into Equifax breach wants answers after credit agency admits that hackers accessed types of data not mentioned in initial disclosure [Read More]
The personal details of 800,000 customers of Swiss telecoms giant Swisscom were compromised in a data breach [Read More]
Gas stations exposed to remote hacker attacks due to several vulnerabilities found in a widely used automation system [Read More]
The 'responsible encryption' demanded by law enforcement and some politicians will not prevent criminals 'going dark'; will weaken cyber security for innocent Americans; and will have a hit on the U.S. economy. [Read More]
The massive 2016 breach that Uber covered up for more than a year was the work of a couple of individuals from Canada and Florida [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Jalal Bouhdada's picture
Jalal Bouhdada, Founder and Principal ICS Security Consultant at Applied Risk, discusses the implications of the new EU Directive on Security of Network and Information Systems (NIS)
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Alastair Paterson's picture
What can U.S.-based companies do to prepare for the GDPR that is due to come into force in May 2018? These five steps can help.
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Steven Grossman's picture
Why do we seem to need layer upon layer of regulation and guidance to try to ensure a more secure business world? Is it working?
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Travis Greene's picture
Reducing the amount of personal data subject to GDPR is a critical step towards minimizing the amount of risk that GDPR will expose.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.