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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

TikTok denies sharing Indian users' data with the Chinese government, after New Delhi banned the wildly popular app in a sharp deterioration of relations with Beijing two weeks after a deadly border clash. [Read More]
California voters will weigh in this November on whether to expand a landmark data privacy law, alter a decades-old law that limits property taxes on businesses and exempt ride-hail giants Uber and Lyft from a new state labor law. [Read More]
Google said that starting June 24, 2020, it will automatically and continuously delete web and app activity and location history for new users after 18 months. [Read More]
Republican senators have introduced what they have described as a “balanced” bill that would require tech companies to give law enforcement access to encrypted data. [Read More]
Twitter has suspended the account of Distributed Denial of Secrets after it posted links to information on 200 law enforcement organizations. [Read More]
A top German court has ordered Facebook to stop merging data collected through its Whatsapp and Instagram subsidiaries or other websites unless users explicitly agree, in a legal victory for competition authorities. [Read More]
Microsoft president Brad Smith on Tuesday said Europe was the global leader on setting rules for big tech, two years after the EU implemented the GDPR, its landmark data privacy law. [Read More]
Twitter has informed business users that their billing information may have been exposed through their web browser’s cache. [Read More]
Apple has announced several new privacy and security features at its 2020 Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC). [Read More]
France's highest administrative authority on Friday dismissed a challenge by Google against a fine of 50 million euros ($56 million) for failing to provide adequate information on its data consent policies. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Alastair Paterson's picture
For companies based in the U.S. with customers and files in many different countries, reconciling conflicting practices and laws is likely to remain a serious headache for years to come.
Jim Gordon's picture
Individuals and security professionals should have a 360 mindset and know the actions needed to take in the pursuit of data protection and the preservation of privacy.
David Holmes's picture
Architects and IT security teams are looking for technology evolutions to help them manage real problems in endpoint storage and messaging.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
Regardless of which framework you use, it’s crucial to operationalize it in the context of your organization’s unique environment and risk factors.
Laurence Pitt's picture
In the coming years the data protection and privacy landscape will change dramatically, improving the experience for us as individuals but potentially making things more complex for businesses.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With more legislation expected, every company should ensure they have a robust framework in place along with strong data mapping capabilities.
Torsten George's picture
By implementing the core pillars of GDPR, organizations can assure they meet the mandate’s requirements while strengthening their cyber security posture.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.