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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Compliance platform Laika has raised $50 million in Series C funding round led by Fin Capital. [Read More]
VMware slapped a critical-severity rating on the bulletin and warned that three of the patched flaws are marked with a CVSS severity score of 9.8/10. [Read More]
For the second consecutive month, Microsoft rushed out patches to cover vulnerabilities that were already exploited as zero-day in the wild, including a pair of belated fixes for exploited Microsoft Exchange Server flaws. [Read More]
Redmond warns that China-based nation state threat actors are taking advantage of a one-year-old law to “stockpile” zero-days for use in sustained malware attacks. [Read More]
Web scraping is a sensitive issue. Should a third party be allowed to visit a website and use automated tools to gather and store information at scale from that website? What if that information includes personal data? What does the law say? Can it be prevented? [Read More]
The mysticism that has allowed tech firms to make billions of dollars from surveillance is finally clearing, says Meredith Whittaker, President of encrypted messaging app Signal. [Read More]
The FTC has reached an agreement with education technology provider Chegg over the company’s cybersecurity mishaps that led to several data breaches. [Read More]
Alcohol delivery app Drizly has agreed to tighten its data security and limit data collection to resolve federal regulators’ allegations that its security failures exposed the personal information of some 2.5 million customers. [Read More]
Two people whose personal information was compromised in a data breach at Rhode Island’s public bus service that affected about 22,000 people sued the agency and a health insurer on Tuesday seeking monetary damages and answers. [Read More]
Australian health insurer Medibank confirms personal and health information of all customers compromised in data breach. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Torsten George's picture
By implementing the core pillars of GDPR, organizations can assure they meet the mandate’s requirements while strengthening their cyber security posture.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.