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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Germany's spy agency can monitor major internet hubs if Berlin deems it necessary for strategic security interests, a federal court has ruled [Read More]
Encrypted email service provider ProtonMail on Wednesday announced the availability of a virtual private network (VPN) service for macOS users. [Read More]
US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross warned that the new EU privacy rules (GDPR) in effect since last week could lead to serious problems for business, medical research and law enforcement on both sides of the Atlantic. [Read More]
Russia's communications watchdog has requested Apple help it block the popular messaging app Telegram which has been banned in the country for refusing to give the security services access to private conversations. [Read More]
The difficulty with the email problem is that it doesn't lend itself to a traditional rules-based solution -- email is used too frequently, too easily, with too many subjects and to too many people. [Read More]
The European Union's new data protection laws came into effect on Friday, with Brussels saying the changes will protect consumers from being like "people naked in an aquarium" [Read More]
CERT/CC announced this week that the CERT Tapioca network traffic/MitM analysis tool has been updated with new features and improvements [Read More]
Researchers demonstrate that the Z-Wave protocol, which is used by more than 100 million IoT devices, is vulnerable to security downgrade attacks [Read More]
Senator Ron Wyden instructs the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to implement HTTPS and other cybersecurity best practices on all its websites and web services [Read More]
FBI admits that – due to flaws in methodology – it inflated the number of devices it could not analyze due to strong encryption [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Jalal Bouhdada's picture
Jalal Bouhdada, Founder and Principal ICS Security Consultant at Applied Risk, discusses the implications of the new EU Directive on Security of Network and Information Systems (NIS)
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Alastair Paterson's picture
What can U.S.-based companies do to prepare for the GDPR that is due to come into force in May 2018? These five steps can help.
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Steven Grossman's picture
Why do we seem to need layer upon layer of regulation and guidance to try to ensure a more secure business world? Is it working?
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Travis Greene's picture
Reducing the amount of personal data subject to GDPR is a critical step towards minimizing the amount of risk that GDPR will expose.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.