Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

UK data watchdog says it intends to fine British Airways £183.39 million ($230 million) for the 2018 data breach that impacted 500,000 of its customers. [Read More]
EFF and OTI have published their combined response to the UK government's Online Harms proposal. [Read More]
China's telecoms giant Huawei remains barred from the development of 5G wireless networks in the United States. [Read More]
Americans are keen on security, but do not necessarily understand it. This is the conclusion of a new survey of 1,300 Americans undertaken by YouGov, which basically suggests that attitudes towards cybersecurity exceed actions taken to ensure cybersecurity. [Read More]
A Boston suburb has voted to ban the use of facial recognition technology by police and other city departments. [Read More]
Italy's data protection watchdog slammed Facebook with a fine of one million euros ($1.1 million) for violating privacy laws over the Cambridge Analytica scandal. [Read More]
Attunity, a Qlik-owned data integration and big data management company used by half of Fortune 100 firms, exposed at least one terabyte of data through unprotected Amazon S3 buckets. [Read More]
Finite State finds many potential backdoors in Huawei equipment, and says the Chinese company’s products are less secure compared to other vendors. [Read More]
A French consumer rights group said Wednesday that it has launched a class action lawsuit against US tech giant Google for violating the EU's strict data privacy laws. [Read More]
Instagram doesn't snoop on private conversations as part of its advertising targeting strategy, the head of the popular social media site said in an interview Tuesday. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

rss icon

Laurence Pitt's picture
In the coming years the data protection and privacy landscape will change dramatically, improving the experience for us as individuals but potentially making things more complex for businesses.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?