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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Australia passed controversial laws allowing spies and police to snoop on the encrypted communications of suspected terrorists and criminals. [Read More]
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg pushed back Wednesday against emails showing the social media giant offering Netflix and other popular apps preferential access to people's data even after it had tightened its privacy rules. [Read More]
Attorneys General from 12 states announce that the first multistate HIPAA-related data breach lawsuit has been filed against Medical Informatics Engineering and NoMoreClipboard after they allowed hackers to steal the information of 3.9 million individuals. [Read More]
The British Parliament has released some 250 pages worth of documents that show Facebook considered charging developers for data access. [Read More]
Thousands of emails were stolen from the hacked accounts of aides to the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) during the 2018 midterm campaign. [Read More]
Hackers may have stolen information on 100 million users after breaching the systems of question-and-answer website Quora. [Read More]
Lenovo has agreed to pay $7.3 million to settle a consumer class action lawsuit related to the Superfish adware scandal from 2015 [Read More]
Several lawsuits filed against Marriott after the company disclosed a data breach impacting 500 million Starwood customers. [Read More]
Facebook considered charging application makers to access data at the social network [Read More]
Seven European consumer groups filed complaints against Google with national regulators Tuesday, accusing the internet giant of covertly tracking users' movements in violation of an EU regulation on data protection [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?