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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Several major organizations hit by data breach at PageUp, an Australian HR software firm whose platform is used around the world [Read More]
Apple said new MacOS Mojave and iOS 12 software powering its mobile devices and computers would include features designed to thwart the use of secret trackers to monitor people's online activities. [Read More]
Ticketfly shuts down website after it was defaced by a hacker. The attacker also obtained personal information on Ticketfly customers [Read More]
Germany's spy agency can monitor major internet hubs if Berlin deems it necessary for strategic security interests, a federal court has ruled [Read More]
Encrypted email service provider ProtonMail on Wednesday announced the availability of a virtual private network (VPN) service for macOS users. [Read More]
US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross warned that the new EU privacy rules (GDPR) in effect since last week could lead to serious problems for business, medical research and law enforcement on both sides of the Atlantic. [Read More]
Russia's communications watchdog has requested Apple help it block the popular messaging app Telegram which has been banned in the country for refusing to give the security services access to private conversations. [Read More]
The European Union's new data protection laws came into effect on Friday, with Brussels saying the changes will protect consumers from being like "people naked in an aquarium" [Read More]
Senator Ron Wyden instructs the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to implement HTTPS and other cybersecurity best practices on all its websites and web services [Read More]
FBI admits that – due to flaws in methodology – it inflated the number of devices it could not analyze due to strong encryption [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.