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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Consumer groups voiced dismay Friday after a US Senate panel considering privacy legislation scheduled a largely industry-packed witness list for an upcoming hearing. [Read More]
New California bill aims to close a loophole in the current data breach notification law by requiring organizations to notify users when passport or biometric information has been compromised. [Read More]
Federal prosecutors have recommended a sentence of nearly three years in prison for a former Virginia high school teacher convicted of hacking into private digital accounts of celebrities and others. [Read More]
Duo Labs announced the public availability of a new service designed to analyze Chrome extensions and deliver security reports on them. [Read More]
Several phone apps are sending sensitive user data, including health information, to Facebook without users' consent, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal. [Read More]
The Face ID and Touch ID authentication feature introduced recently to WhatsApp for iOS can be easily bypassed, but a patch has been released. [Read More]
Mexico’s privacy watchdog says the federal Attorney General’s Office stonewalled it for more than a year as it tried to investigate the government’s use of powerful Israeli spyware against journalists, lawyers and activists. [Read More]
Google said it forgot to mention that it included a microphone in its Nest Secure home alarm system, the latest privacy flub by one of the tech industry’s leading collectors of personal information. [Read More]
Basic personal information collected from more than 100 million Americans during the 2010 head count could be reconstructed from obscured data, but with lots of mistakes, a top agency official said. [Read More]
Mobile privacy reasearch group AppCensus has discovered 18,000 Android applications that violate Google Play’s advertising identifier (ad ID) policies and users’ privacy. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.
Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).
Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.