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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Google on Tuesday defended a project aimed at modernizing healthcare while giving it access to medical data of millions of people. [Read More]
US customs officers cannot search the computers and phones of people arriving in America unless they have "reasonable suspicion," a federal judge ruled in a decision praised by rights activists. [Read More]
Whistleblowers and digital pioneers have long been sounding the alarm about abuses of our privacy online, and tech entrepreneurs are bidding to turn growing consciousness about the problem into a money-making industry. [Read More]
California's attorney general accuses Facebook of failing to provide a slew of information subpoenaed in a probe of its privacy practices begun last year in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. [Read More]
Leaked documents from a civil suit against Facebook show how the social network aimed to employ user data as a tool for bargaining and to manipulate competitors. [Read More]
Facebook says 100 third-party application developers continued to access user information via the Groups API even after access to the data was restricted. [Read More]
IBM said that instead of banning all facial recognition technology, policymakers should employ "precision regulation" in cases where there is "greater risk of societal harm." [Read More]
Technology has given internet giants "irresistible power" when they work in concert with governments, whistleblower Ed Snowden told the Web Summit that opened in Lisbon on Monday. [Read More]
Proton Technologies, the company behind the privacy-focused email service ProtonMail, has made available the source code of its iOS client application. [Read More]
A controversial law that would allow Russia to cut internet traffic from international servers came into force Friday, prompting fears from rights activists of online isolation. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.