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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Data of 2.4 million users of the Blur password manager was exposed online due to a misconfigured AWS S3 bucket. [Read More]
A law requiring internet companies in Vietnam to remove content communist authorities deem to be against the state came into effect Tuesday, in a move critics called "a totalitarian model of information control". [Read More]
Executives may need to reconsider whether Amazon's Alexa personal assistant is listening to more than just their commands. [Read More]
Data security solutions provider Egress raises $40 million in Series C funding round. The money will be used to accelerate growth and development of new technologies. [Read More]
The Irish data watchdog on Friday launched an investigation into Facebook, after the social media titan admitted a "bug" may have exposed unposted photos from up to 6.8 million users. [Read More]
Germany's IT watchdog has expressed scepticism about calls for a boycott of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, saying it has seen no evidence the firm could use its equipment to spy for Beijing. [Read More]
Facebook discovered a vulnerability in the Photo API that could have allowed third-party apps to access all of a user’s photos. Up to 6.8 million users and 1,500 apps are impacted. [Read More]
A government organization in Rhode Island has initiated a class action against Alphabet over the recent Google+ API security incidents. [Read More]
Super Micro says it has conducted a thorough investigation following the recent Bloomberg report, but claims it has found “absolutely no evidence of malicious hardware” on its motherboards. [Read More]
Secure messaging applications such as Telegram, Signal and WhatsApp can expose user messages through a session hijacking attack, Cisco’s Talos security researchers warn. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.
David Holmes's picture
The portion of encrypted traffic keeps rising, so IT security administrators will be forced to do more SSL decryption if they are to get any value at all out of their fancy security tools.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.