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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

US regulators have reportedly approved a $5 billion penalty to be levied on Facebook to settle a probe into the social network's privacy and data protection lapses. [Read More]
Apple disabled the Walkie-Talkie app on the Apple Watch after learning of a serious vulnerability that can be exploited to eavesdrop via another user’s iPhone. [Read More]
Google contractors regularly listen to and review some recordings of what people say to artificial-intelligence system Google Assistant, via their phone or through smart speakers such as the Google Home. [Read More]
San Francisco-based privacy compliance and data protection firm TrustArc raises $70 million in a Series D funding round. [Read More]
UK data watchdog says it intends to fine British Airways £183.39 million ($230 million) for the 2018 data breach that impacted 500,000 of its customers. [Read More]
EFF and OTI have published their combined response to the UK government's Online Harms proposal. [Read More]
China's telecoms giant Huawei remains barred from the development of 5G wireless networks in the United States. [Read More]
Americans are keen on security, but do not necessarily understand it. This is the conclusion of a new survey of 1,300 Americans undertaken by YouGov, which basically suggests that attitudes towards cybersecurity exceed actions taken to ensure cybersecurity. [Read More]
A Boston suburb has voted to ban the use of facial recognition technology by police and other city departments. [Read More]
Italy's data protection watchdog slammed Facebook with a fine of one million euros ($1.1 million) for violating privacy laws over the Cambridge Analytica scandal. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.