Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Videoconferencing platform Zoom is rolling out a number of measures meant to stem criticism over how it has handled security as users flock to the application during the coronavirus pandemic. [Read More]
India has banned the use of video-conferencing app Zoom for government remote meetings. [Read More]
Video game peripherals maker SCUF Gaming exposed to the web a database containing information on more than 1.1 million users. [Read More]
Google and Apple are developing a coronavirus smartphone "contact tracing" tool that could potentially alert people when they have crossed paths with an infected person. [Read More]
Heat sensors are taking the temperature of citizens in Italy and sending the information to a drone operator, who stares at a thermal map on his hand-held screen -- shining orange and purple blobs. [Read More]
An exposed AWS S3 bucket belonging to RigUp was found to expose tens of thousands of private files belonging to organizations and individuals in the U.S. energy sector. [Read More]
Data privacy company Privitar has raised $80 million in a Series C funding round led by Warburg Pincus. [Read More]
Security solutions provider Avast this week announced the launch of an Android version of its Avast Secure Browser. [Read More]
Zoom has promised to improve security and privacy, but an increasing number of organizations have decided to ban the video conferencing application. [Read More]
Government-sanctioned COVID-19 mobile applications are affected by vulnerabilities and privacy issues that put citizens at risk. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.