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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

In addition to the hacking conspiracy charge brought in April by the US government, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange now faces 17 counts under the Espionage Act. [Read More]
Amazon confirmed that shareholders rejected proposals to prohibit sales of facial recognition technology to governments and study how it might threaten privacy or civil rights. [Read More]
LinkedIn has once again put user data and privacy at risk by allowing a TLS certificate to expire. [Read More]
After one year of operation, some 144,376 complaints and questions were registered with the EU's national authorities in charge of enforcing GDPR. [Read More]
European Digital Rights (EDRi), together with 45 NGOs, academics and companies across 15 countries, has sent an open letter to European policymakers and regulators, warning about widespread and potentially growing use of deep packet inspection (DPI) by ISPS. [Read More]
Facebook has partially restored the View As feature abused by hackers last year in a massive data breach that affected 29 million accounts. [Read More]
Google is offering to replace Bluetooth Titan Security Keys for free after researchers at Microsoft discovered a misconfiguration that can be exploited to attack the devices. [Read More]
An Israeli spyware company named in a Financial Times report on a WhatsApp security flaw prides itself on "rigorous, ethical standards" despite previous links to alleged espionage. [Read More]
San Francisco became the first US city to ban use of facial recognition technology by police or other government agencies. [Read More]
Twitter warned that a bug in Twitter for iOS led to the company inadvertently collecting location data and sharing it with a third-party. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.