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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

An Austrian law graduate spearheading a class action case against Facebook for alleged privacy breaches officially filed the suit in a Vienna court.
Activist groups unveiled a new coalition aimed at repealing the law authorizing mass surveillance by US intelligence and law enforcement agencies.
Americans might oppose intrusive surveillance if they realized the government can see their most intimate emailed pictures, comic John Oliver suggested to fugitive intelligence technician Edward Snowden.
Snapchat released its first transparency report showing hundreds of requests from US and foreign law enforcement agencies.
The UN Human Rights Council appointed an investigator to look into violations of digital privacy rights, following revelations of large-scale cyber-snooping by Washington and others.
Big US technology firms joined a coalition of activists urging Congress to pass a law scaling back government surveillance ahead of key deadline.
Technology firms will ultimately prevail in their efforts to use strong encryption on devices that cannot be accessed by the government, Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt said.
U.S. government requests for data on Facebook users declined during the final six months of 2014, according to the social networking site's transparency report.
Americans have been stepping up efforts to keep their data private since the revelations about vast US government surveillance programs, a survey showed.
The Senate Intelligence Committee passed the controversial Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, or CISA, by a vote of 14 to 1 on Thursday afternoon.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Gant Redmon's picture
Parenting, much like our legal system, is founded on three basic steps: 1) establish rules, 2) monitor compliance, and 3) modify non-compliant behavior.
Gant Redmon's picture
In the spirit of "trust but verify", you may occasionally scroll through your kid’s email or Google+ account, or pick up their phone to glance at recent texts. One would think this behavior it protected by law. Surprisingly, wiretap laws don’t have carve outs for parental snooping.
Gant Redmon's picture
By comparing what was creepy a few years back with what is creepy today and asking “why the change,” we will see the commonalities of creepiness and lessons for all who wish to make a successful business involving personal information.
Gant Redmon's picture
The CSO is so critical for the CPO’s success that I guarantee that if you send this article to your CPO, they will take you out for a free lunch the next day.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The Omnibus Rule that updated the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) has the potential to be a game changer because of the things it says in writing, as well as some of the things that it doesn’t say.
Gant Redmon's picture
What is unique to the Patriot Act compared to most other countries is the need for a court order. Most other countries allow their government authorities to go directly to the data host with administrative orders to produce data.
Gant Redmon's picture
Being in a public place makes you fair game. So what makes a place private instead of public? This is where that famed “reasonable person” comes in.