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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Facebook this week confirmed that it indeed knows when users access websites and apps that use Facebook services, even if they don’t have an account on the social network. [Read More]
Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg testified for nearly 10 hours over two days on Facebook's privacy and data protection issues before committees of the Senate and House: [Read More]
In the United States there are practically no laws against the use of data from social media or search engines, but the Federal Trade Commission did sanction Facebook in 2011 for its handling of personal data. [Read More]
Mark Zuckerberg will appear before US lawmakers as a firestorm rocks Facebook over its data privacy scandal, with pressure mounting for new regulations on social media platforms. [Read More]
Facebook was aware more than two years ago of Cambridge Analytica's harvesting of the personal profiles of up to 87 million users and cannot rule out other cases of abuse of user data. [Read More]
Facebook said it is updating its terms on privacy and data sharing to give users a clearer picture of how the social network handles personal information. [Read More]
Facebook said personal data on as many as 87 million users was improperly shared with British political consultancy Cambridge Analytica. [Read More]
The question is whether Facebook and/or CA would have been in breach of GDPR were it already operational, and therefore whether GDPR will prevent any future repetitions of this sort. [Read More]
Chinese people and foreign firms are girding for a weekend deadline that will curb the use of unlicensed software to circumvent internet controls, as the government plugs holes in its "Great Firewall". [Read More]
Facebook has announced a series of changes to its developer platform to implement tighter user privacy controls and limit how apps can access to user data. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.
Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).
Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.