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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The US, UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Japan have officially accused China of sponsoring the attacks of the APT10 hacker group against MSPs and other organizations around the world. [Read More]
The Department of Defense lacks visibility into software inventories, a review of Marine Corps, Navy, and Air Force commands and divisions reveals. [Read More]
Huawei defends its global ambitions and network security in the face of Western fears that the Chinese telecom giant could serve as a Trojan horse for Beijing's security apparatus. [Read More]
Data security solutions provider Egress raises $40 million in Series C funding round. The money will be used to accelerate growth and development of new technologies. [Read More]
A Czech cyber-security agency on Monday warned against using the software and hardware of China's Huawei and ZTE companies, saying they posed a threat to state security. [Read More]
Germany's IT watchdog has expressed scepticism about calls for a boycott of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, saying it has seen no evidence the firm could use its equipment to spy for Beijing. [Read More]
Tigera, a company that specializes in Kubernetes security and compliance, raises $30 million in a Series B funding round, which brings the total raised by the company to date to $53 million. [Read More]
A government organization in Rhode Island has initiated a class action against Alphabet over the recent Google+ API security incidents. [Read More]
Super Micro says it has conducted a thorough investigation following the recent Bloomberg report, but claims it has found “absolutely no evidence of malicious hardware” on its motherboards. [Read More]
A new class action lawsuit filed against Marriott following the massive data breach alleges that the hotel giant still exposes customer information. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Compliance

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Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Mike Fleck's picture
Big companies can say they are GFPR compliant, but odds are their current structure will never allow them to find, identify, and categorize all the data that they have collected over time.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Despite the long ramp-up towards the GDPR compliance deadline, the effects of the new regulations are still very much in infancy.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Bradon Rogers's picture
Complying with GDPR was the immediate challenge, but now there is an opportunity to capture the good work that has been done and make data protection a top of mind focus for enterprises every day.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With domain name WHOIS data subject to the GDPR’s privacy requirements, the system will “go dark” until alternative preparations are made, creating a challenge for this who fight computer fraud and other criminal activity on the Internet.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Penalties for non-compliance with GDPR will be severe. For example, if your organization fails to report a data breach within 72 hours, expect a fine.
Jalal Bouhdada's picture
Jalal Bouhdada, Founder and Principal ICS Security Consultant at Applied Risk, discusses the implications of the new EU Directive on Security of Network and Information Systems (NIS)