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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

FireEye researchers discover several vulnerabilities in Logitech’s Harmony Hub home control system. Flaws patched with firmware update [Read More]
Personnel on US military bases can no longer buy phones and other gear manufactured by Chinese firms Huawei and ZTE, after the Pentagon said the devices pose an "unacceptable" security risk. [Read More]
Hackers target a couple of recently disclosed vulnerabilities affecting Dasan routers. One million potentially vulnerable devices accessible directly from the Internet [Read More]
Researchers demonstrate GLitch, a Rowhammer attack that leverages the GPU and can be exploited to hijack browsers on Android smartphones [Read More]
Mobile phone maker BLU Products has reached a settlement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over allegations that software in its devices collected users’ personal information. [Read More]
Regulus Cyber raises $6.3 million in seed and Series A funding, and unveils a solution designed to protect sensors, communications and data in cars, robots and drones [Read More]
Unpatched vulnerabilities expose more than one million GPON home routers made by Dasan to remote hacking. Dasan routers are known to be targeted by cybercriminals [Read More]
A researcher has developed a tool that helps Mac laptop users detect evil maid attacks by monitoring the state of the device’s lid [Read More]
Google is taking another step to protect Android users when browsing the Internet by making Safe Browsing in WebView set by default. [Read More]
The iTunes Wi-Fi sync feature in iOS can be abused to take control of iPhones and iPads in what researchers call a Trustjacking attack [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
Adam Ely's picture
The increase in mobile security conversations shows that teams are still trying to figure out their strategy and how to address this new landscape of vulnerabilities.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.
Adam Ely's picture
The mobile strategist will play a pivotal role in mobile integration, as they pave the way for the organizations to do so purposefully and securely.
David Holmes's picture
After the rounds of predictions for 2014, I had bet my colleague that if no mobile DDoS appeared this year, we’d stop talking about it. And it looks like we can.