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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Washington has the right to block US federal agencies from buying products by Huawei on cybersecurity grounds, a judge has ruled, dismissing the Chinese telecom giant's legal challenge to a purchase ban. [Read More]
SweynTooth: security researchers have discovered numerous vulnerabilities in the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) implementations of major SoC vendors. [Read More]
A Google researcher claims that some of the security features added by Samsung to the Android kernel don’t provide meaningful protection and they actually increase the attack surface. [Read More]
The Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp said Wednesday it now has more than two billion users around the world as it reaffirmed its commitment to strong encryption to protect privacy. [Read More]
Google Play Protect now scans over 100 billion applications on Android devices daily, according to new figures disclosed by Google. [Read More]
One of the security flaws that Google addressed with the February 2020 Android patches is a critical vulnerability in Bluetooth that could lead to code execution. [Read More]
Malicious optimizer, booster, and utility applications hosted on Google Play gathered nearly half a million downloads before being taken down. [Read More]
Google this week released the February 2020 set of security updates for the Android operating system, which address a total of 25 vulnerabilities, including 2 rated critical severity. [Read More]
The United States has welcomed the European Union's new rules on fifth-generation internet but pressed them to go further after the bloc resisted Washington's pressure to ban China's Huawei directly. [Read More]
The EU’s executive Commission outlined a set of strategic and technical measures aimed at reducing cybersecurity risks from 5G mobile networks. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.