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Mobile & Wireless
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Apple hit back at a Google research report suggesting iPhones may have been targeted by a long-running hacking operation, calling it inaccurate and misleading. [Read More]
Android is affected by an unpatched privilege escalation vulnerability residing in the V4L2 driver. [Read More]
Phone numbers linked to more than 400 million Facebook accounts were reportedly found online, but the social media giant believes the actual number of impacted accounts is roughly half of that. [Read More]
Twitter has decided to temporarily disable tweeting via SMS after hackers abused the feature to hijack the account of the social media company’s CEO. [Read More]
Google this week released Android security patches that address nearly 50 vulnerabilities in multiple components, including two critical flaws impacting Media framework. [Read More]
An SMS phishing attack against many modern Android phones could route all internet traffic through a proxy controlled by the attacker. [Read More]
Even with considerable security precautions in place, Twitter chief executive Jack Dorsey became the victim of an embarrassing compromise when attackers took control of his account on the platform by hijacking his phone number. [Read More]
Chinese telecom equipment maker Huawei accused U.S. authorities on Wednesday of attempting to break into its information systems and of trying to coerce its employees to gather information on the company. [Read More]
Exploit acquisition firm Zerodium is offering up to $2.5 million for a complete Android exploit, more than what it’s offering for the same type of exploit on iOS. [Read More]
A Chinese face-swapping app that allows users to convincingly superimpose their own likeness over characters in movies or TV shows has rapidly become one of the country's most downloaded apps, but has triggered a backlash over privacy fears. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.