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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

China urged France Monday to guarantee a "fair and just" environment for its companies after Paris decided to restrict licenses for telecom operators using 5G technology from Huawei. [Read More]
China's Huawei is not totally banned from France's next-generation 5G wireless market, but French operators using them will only get limited licences. [Read More]
For seven years, a Chinese threat actor has targeted the Uyghur ethnic minority with several malware families, including newly identified Android surveillance tools. [Read More]
European police shut down an encrypted phone network used by criminals after hacking into the provider's servers and monitoring customers' conversations. [Read More]
Google this week shared details on how it is fighting memory bugs in Android 11, as well as on other security improvements that the upcoming platform version will deliver. [Read More]
China on Wednesday demanded Washington stop “oppressing Chinese companies” after U.S. regulators declared telecom equipment suppliers Huawei and ZTE to be national security threats. [Read More]
Chinese telecommunication solutions providers Huawei and ZTE have been declared national security threats by the FCC. [Read More]
TikTok denies sharing Indian users' data with the Chinese government, after New Delhi banned the wildly popular app in a sharp deterioration of relations with Beijing two weeks after a deadly border clash. [Read More]
India has banned 59 Chinese mobile apps, including the wildly popular TikTok and WeChat, over national security and privacy concerns two weeks after a deadly Himalayan border clash between the nuclear-armed neighbours. [Read More]
Apple has acquired Fleetsmith, a company that specializes in solutions that automate the setup, patching and security of Macs, iPhones, iPads and Apple TV devices. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.