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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Mike Murray, a longtime practitioner and executive who was deeply embedded in the cybersecurity industry, passed away suddenly at the age of 46. [Read More]
A successor of the Exobot Android trojan, Octo was recently updated with remote access capabilities, which allows operators to perform on-device fraud. [Read More]
Starting November 2022, all applications will be required to target “an API level within two years of the latest major Android release.” [Read More]
SharkBot can steal user credentials and initiate unauthorized money transfers. [Read More]
Apple is being called to task for neglecting to patch two "actively exploited" zero-day vulnerabilities on older versions of its flagship macOS platform. [Read More]
Posing as Process Manager, the malware asks for extensive permissions and has data theft and user tracking capabilities. [Read More]
Four months since the Log4j issue exploded onto the internet, all the major affected vendors have released patches – but even where companies have patched, security experts warn it's a mistake to relax. [Read More]
Apple’s security response team on Thursday released emergency patches to cover a pair of “actively exploited” vulnerabilities affecting macOS, iOS and iPadOS devices. [Read More]
Researchers have intercepted a destructive wiper malware dubbed "AcidRain" that is hitting routers and modems with digital breadcrumbs suggesting a link to the devastating Viasat hack that took down wind turbines in Germany. [Read More]
Mobile security firm Zimperium will be acquired for roughly $525 million by Liberty Strategic Capital, the private equity firm founded by Steven T. Mnuchin, former Treasury Secretary under President Donald Trump. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
While BYOD is concerned with the risk from personal devices, BYON (Bring Your Own Network) is a different type of risk
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
If regulatory protected information gets onto your device, you are obligated to protect it. Are you fully prepared to guarantee that everything you are doing on your personally managed device meets the obligations of you and your organization to protect sensitive information?
Chris Poulin's picture
Before you join the stampede with all the organizations who have bought into the concept of unifying personal and business devices, consider that one size can risk all.
Marc Solomon's picture
Organizations need to understand the security gaps the Mobile Enterprise presents and embrace a combination of security tools and techniques to bridge these gaps.
Johnnie Konstantas's picture
How can you defend against a new generation of threats and attackers that are leveraging automation and outpacing alerting mechanisms and manual-access controls?
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Hacking a phone is one thing, but hacking voicemail is something else, and while your voicemail does have some protection, breaking into it is not very complicated.
Johnnie Konstantas's picture
IT managers aren’t the only ones aware of this BYOD trend – attackers are too. Whether their aim is to promote a cause (hacktivism) or turn a profit, our mobile devices constitute perhaps the easiest way to do so.
Chris Hinkley's picture
Mobile applications and the platforms they are built on make PA-DSS compliance difficult due to the rapidly evolving threat landscape. With increased attacks and their tragic affects on businesses and consumers, it's important to make make sure your mobile operations properly secured.
Oliver Rochford's picture
Mobile devices share basic components as a PC, but that is truly where the similarities end. The differences are far more important than the shared points, and will scupper most traditional security approaches, which all hinge on one really simple idea.
Andrew Jaquith's picture
Last spring I predicted that if sales of the BlackBerry PlayBook were less than 1/4 of the number of iPads sold, we'd know what the next five years of enterprise security would look like. How did RIM do? Not so well, as it turns out.