Security Experts:

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A recently discovered Android malware features a modular architecture that allows it to perform a broad range of nefarious activities, Kaspersky Lab researchers warn. [Read More]
Cisco announces availability of Security Connector, an iOS app that gives organizations visibility and control for mobile devices [Read More]
Kaspersky Lab researchers discovered 85 applications in Google Play that were designed to steal credentials for Russian social network One of the malicious applications had more than a million downloads. [Read More]
Google’s Ian Beer releases iOS 11 exploit that can be used for jailbreaks to help security researchers analyze Apple devices [Read More]
After getting complaints from developers, Google is evaluating whether it should continue allowing innovative use of accessibility services by Android apps [Read More]
Android security updates for December 2017 patch 47 vulnerabilities, including 10 rated critical [Read More]
Google is stepping up the fight against unwanted and harmful applications on Android and will soon start alerting users on apps and websites leading to apps that collect personal data without their consent. [Read More]
A newly discovered backdoor that has managed to infect over one thousand Android devices was designed to steal sensitive data from popular social media applications, Google reveals. [Read More]
Seventy-five percent of 300 Android apps tested by Exodus Privacy and analyzed by the Yale Privacy Lab contain embedded trackers. [Read More]
Researchers discovered new Android malware apparently being used by the North Korea-linked Lazarus group to target users in South Korea [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Danelle Au's picture
Enterprises must find the right balance to deliver a mobile security environment that meets productivity and flexibility needs without putting devices, apps, or data at risk.
Ryan Naraine's picture
In this podcast, Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel in the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, talks about the new Microsoft Cybercrime Center and the ongoing battle to stop the proliferation of botnets around the world.
Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek join the podcast to talk about their work hacking the into modern vehicles to manipulate steering, acceleration, speedometers and safety sensors.