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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Virtualization company Corellium says it was sued by Apple after the tech giant failed to acquire its technology for the price it wanted. [Read More]
Canada's spy agencies are divided over whether or not to ban Chinese technology giant Huawei from fifth generation (5G) networks over security concerns. [Read More]
Bug hunters have earned a total of $120,000 on the second day of Pwn2Own Tokyo 2019 for hacking Samsung Galaxy S10, Xiaomi Mi9 and TP-Link AC1750 devices. [Read More]
Google this week announced a partnership with several security solutions providers, aimed at fighting bad applications in the Android ecosystem. [Read More]
Google releases November 2019 patches for Android to address nearly 40 vulnerabilities in the platform, including critical flaws in the System component. [Read More]
Proton Technologies, the company behind the privacy-focused email service ProtonMail, has made available the source code of its iOS client application. [Read More]
India demanded answers from WhatsApp over a snooping scandal Thursday after coming under fire from critics who accused authorities of using malware installed on the Facebook-owned messaging service to spy on citizens. [Read More]
Corellium, a virtualization company that creates perfect replicas of the iPhone and iOS for security research and testing purposes, has responded to Apple’s lawsuit. [Read More]
Apple patches 40 vulnerabilities in macOS Catalina and iOS 13, including flaws that affect both operating systems. [Read More]
Israeli spyware company NSO Group is accused by WhatsApp of cyberespionage targeting journalists, lawyers, human rights activists and others on the Facebook-owned messaging service. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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David Holmes's picture
After the rounds of predictions for 2014, I had bet my colleague that if no mobile DDoS appeared this year, we’d stop talking about it. And it looks like we can.
Adam Ely's picture
While mobile security remains at the top of every CISO’s priority list this year, enterprises have quickly begun to realize that mobile device management (MDM) and enterprise mobility management (EMM) are not enough to keep data safe.
Adam Ely's picture
From what to support to how to ensure the security of mobile apps and data, enterprises are banging their heads against the wall to find a solution to secure mobile.
Adam Ely's picture
We can attempt to predict the future, but without proper security measures in place, data breaches are bound to happen. Unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if a breach will occur, but when.
Adam Ely's picture
When determining how risky an app is, we must consider intentional features within these permissions to determine whether or not they’re a risk to the enterprise.
Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.