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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

An analysis of Android flashlight apps available in Google Play reveals that they request an average of 25 permissions, with some requesting up to 77 permissions when installed. [Read More]
Simjacker is a SIM card attack that could work against over 1 billion mobile phones, and researchers say it has already been exploited by a company to track users. [Read More]
Telegram was found to breach users’ privacy by failing to remove images from a device’s local storage when the sender selects to delete them for all recipients. [Read More]
Apple hit back at a Google research report suggesting iPhones may have been targeted by a long-running hacking operation, calling it inaccurate and misleading. [Read More]
Android is affected by an unpatched privilege escalation vulnerability residing in the V4L2 driver. [Read More]
Phone numbers linked to more than 400 million Facebook accounts were reportedly found online, but the social media giant believes the actual number of impacted accounts is roughly half of that. [Read More]
Twitter has decided to temporarily disable tweeting via SMS after hackers abused the feature to hijack the account of the social media company’s CEO. [Read More]
Google this week released Android security patches that address nearly 50 vulnerabilities in multiple components, including two critical flaws impacting Media framework. [Read More]
An SMS phishing attack against many modern Android phones could route all internet traffic through a proxy controlled by the attacker. [Read More]
Even with considerable security precautions in place, Twitter chief executive Jack Dorsey became the victim of an embarrassing compromise when attackers took control of his account on the platform by hijacking his phone number. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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David Holmes's picture
After the rounds of predictions for 2014, I had bet my colleague that if no mobile DDoS appeared this year, we’d stop talking about it. And it looks like we can.
Adam Ely's picture
While mobile security remains at the top of every CISO’s priority list this year, enterprises have quickly begun to realize that mobile device management (MDM) and enterprise mobility management (EMM) are not enough to keep data safe.
Adam Ely's picture
From what to support to how to ensure the security of mobile apps and data, enterprises are banging their heads against the wall to find a solution to secure mobile.
Adam Ely's picture
We can attempt to predict the future, but without proper security measures in place, data breaches are bound to happen. Unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if a breach will occur, but when.
Adam Ely's picture
When determining how risky an app is, we must consider intentional features within these permissions to determine whether or not they’re a risk to the enterprise.
Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.