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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Three fake Bitcoin applications were recently removed from Google Play after security researchers discovered they were tricking users into sending funds to cybercriminals. [Read More]
Some of the rugged tablets, phones and PDAs made by Pepperl+Fuchs-owned ecom are vulnerable to KRACK attacks [Read More]
A recently discovered Android malware features a modular architecture that allows it to perform a broad range of nefarious activities, Kaspersky Lab researchers warn. [Read More]
Cisco announces availability of Security Connector, an iOS app that gives organizations visibility and control for mobile devices [Read More]
Kaspersky Lab researchers discovered 85 applications in Google Play that were designed to steal credentials for Russian social network VK.com. One of the malicious applications had more than a million downloads. [Read More]
Google’s Ian Beer releases iOS 11 exploit that can be used for jailbreaks to help security researchers analyze Apple devices [Read More]
After getting complaints from developers, Google is evaluating whether it should continue allowing innovative use of accessibility services by Android apps [Read More]
Android security updates for December 2017 patch 47 vulnerabilities, including 10 rated critical [Read More]
Google is stepping up the fight against unwanted and harmful applications on Android and will soon start alerting users on apps and websites leading to apps that collect personal data without their consent. [Read More]
A newly discovered backdoor that has managed to infect over one thousand Android devices was designed to steal sensitive data from popular social media applications, Google reveals. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Adam Ely's picture
We can attempt to predict the future, but without proper security measures in place, data breaches are bound to happen. Unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if a breach will occur, but when.
Adam Ely's picture
When determining how risky an app is, we must consider intentional features within these permissions to determine whether or not they’re a risk to the enterprise.
Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.
Adam Ely's picture
Many of us create our own blind spots through assumption. Until we understand what is occurring on mobile devices, we cannot determine if our controls are effective at managing risk.
Adam Ely's picture
CISOs are notoriously disliked. Trying to protect company, customer and employee data often means having to say “no” to new projects and implementations. This does not earn you many friends.
Ryan Naraine's picture
John Hultquist, Manager of Cyber Espionage Threat Intelligence at ISIGHT Partners, joins the podcast to talk about "NEWSCASTER," a cyber espionage operation that uses fictitious social media accounts to launch attacks.