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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Google releases the July 2019 patches for the Android operating system - it addresses a total of 33 vulnerabilities, including 9 rated critical. [Read More]
The US trade war truce with China which could ease sanctions on Huawei has prompted a backlash from lawmakers over national security concerns amid confusion over how the deal may impact the Chinese tech giant. [Read More]
Finite State finds many potential backdoors in Huawei equipment, and says the Chinese company’s products are less secure compared to other vendors. [Read More]
A French consumer rights group said Wednesday that it has launched a class action lawsuit against US tech giant Google for violating the EU's strict data privacy laws. [Read More]
Presidential Alerts that all modern cell phones are required to receive and display as part of the Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) program can be spoofed, researchers have discovered. [Read More]
Instagram doesn't snoop on private conversations as part of its advertising targeting strategy, the head of the popular social media site said in an interview Tuesday. [Read More]
A newly discovered crypto-currency mining botnet can spread via open ADB (Android Debug Bridge) ports and Secure Shell (SSH), Trend Micro reports. [Read More]
Malware analyst Lukas Stefanko reported on apps that impersonate the Turkish cryptocurrency exchange, BtcTurk, and phish for login credentials to the service. [Read More]
Encrypted messaging service Telegram suffered a major cyber-attack that appeared to originate from China, the company's CEO said Thursday, linking it to the ongoing political unrest in Hong Kong. [Read More]
Facebook on Tuesday launched an app that will pay users to share information with the social media giant about which apps they’re using. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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David Holmes's picture
After the rounds of predictions for 2014, I had bet my colleague that if no mobile DDoS appeared this year, we’d stop talking about it. And it looks like we can.
Adam Ely's picture
While mobile security remains at the top of every CISO’s priority list this year, enterprises have quickly begun to realize that mobile device management (MDM) and enterprise mobility management (EMM) are not enough to keep data safe.
Adam Ely's picture
From what to support to how to ensure the security of mobile apps and data, enterprises are banging their heads against the wall to find a solution to secure mobile.
Adam Ely's picture
We can attempt to predict the future, but without proper security measures in place, data breaches are bound to happen. Unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if a breach will occur, but when.
Adam Ely's picture
When determining how risky an app is, we must consider intentional features within these permissions to determine whether or not they’re a risk to the enterprise.
Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.