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Microsoft Opens High Tech Cybercrime Center

Microsoft said Thursday that it has opened a new cybercrime center that combines the software giant’s legal and technical expertise along with cutting-edge tools and technology and cross-industry expertise to combat cyber crime.

Microsoft said Thursday that it has opened a new cybercrime center that combines the software giant’s legal and technical expertise along with cutting-edge tools and technology and cross-industry expertise to combat cyber crime.

Located at Microsoft’s campus in Redmond, Washington, the center houses technologies that enable teams to visualize and identify global cyberthreats developing in real time, including SitePrint, which allows the mapping of online organized crime networks; PhotoDNA, a leading anti-child-pornography technology; cyberforensics, a new investigative capability that detects global cybercrime, including online fraud and identity theft; and cyberthreat intelligence from Microsoft’s botnet takedown operations.

Microsoft Cybercrime Center Photo“The Microsoft Cybercrime Center is where our experts come together with customers and partners to focus on one thing: keeping people safe online,” said David Finn, associate general counsel of the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit. “By combining sophisticated tools and technology with the right skills and new perspectives, we can make the Internet safer for everyone.”

The Cybercrime Center also has a secure location for third-party partners, including from academia and law enforcement, allowing cybersecurity experts from around the world to work in the facility with Microsoft’s experts for an indefinite period of time.

“With nearly 100 attorneys, investigators, technical experts and forensic analysts based around the world, the Microsoft Cybercrime Center is well positioned to make it safer for people online worldwide,” Microsoft said in a statement.

“In the fight against cybercrime the public sector significantly benefits from private sector expertise, such as provided by Microsoft,” said Noboru Nakatani, executive director of the INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation. “The security community needs to build on its coordinated responses to keep pace with today’s cybercriminals. The Microsoft Cybercrime Center will be an important hub in accomplishing that task more effectively and proactively.”

Microsoft produced the video below which explains more about the new Cybercrime Center.

Written By

For more than 10 years, Mike Lennon has been closely monitoring the threat landscape and analyzing trends in the National Security and enterprise cybersecurity space. In his role at SecurityWeek, he oversees the editorial direction of the publication and is the Director of several leading security industry conferences around the world.

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