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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

ICS-targeting Snake/EKANS ransomware manipulates the firewall to isolate infected systems before initiating the file encryption process. [Read More]
Morocco's prime minister has demanded Amnesty International provide evidence to support its allegations that Rabat used spyware to bug a journalist's phone. [Read More]
The Valak information stealer is being distributed in ongoing campaigns aimed at enterprises in North America, South America, Europe and likely other regions. [Read More]
The threat actor behind the Sodinokibi (REvil) ransomware is demanding a $14 million ransom from Brazilian-based electrical energy company Light S.A. [Read More]
For seven years, a Chinese threat actor has targeted the Uyghur ethnic minority with several malware families, including newly identified Android surveillance tools. [Read More]
European police shut down an encrypted phone network used by criminals after hacking into the provider's servers and monitoring customers' conversations. [Read More]
Researchers have discovered ThiefQuest, a new Mac malware that acts like a piece of ransomware, but also allows its operators to steal data and take full control of an infected device. [Read More]
The operators of the Maze ransomware claim they hacked printing giant Xerox and they are threatening to leak data stolen from the company unless it pays up. [Read More]
China on Wednesday demanded Washington stop “oppressing Chinese companies” after U.S. regulators declared telecom equipment suppliers Huawei and ZTE to be national security threats. [Read More]
Chinese telecommunication solutions providers Huawei and ZTE have been declared national security threats by the FCC. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Studying the DNC Hacker case shows just how difficult it is to maintain a false identity in the face of a highly resourced and motivated opponent.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Actively investigating and infiltrating criminal groups online is not “hacking back,” but it may provoke that as a response.
Alastair Paterson's picture
Malicious actors have been experimenting with a blockchain domain name system (DNS) as a way of hiding their malicious activity and bullet-proofing their offerings.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Laurence Pitt's picture
While awareness is key and technology is a great assistant, there is one simple practice we can all adopt: think before you click or share.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Alastair Paterson's picture
By closely following trends watching for new activities and actors across a variety of data sources, security professionals can continue to take steps to mitigate the digital risk to their enterprises, partners and customers.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.