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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The United Nations’ human rights chief voiced alarm Monday over the reported use of military-grade malware from Israel-based NSO Group to spy on journalists, human rights activists and political dissidents. [Read More]
Here’s what you need to know about a new report on NSO Group, the notorious Israeli hacker-for-hire company and maker of Pegasus malware. [Read More]
Microsoft secures a court order to take down malicious domains that impersonate legitimate organizations. [Read More]
Networking gear vendor Juniper Networks ships product updates to address critical security vulnerabilities. [Read More]
Reports that Israel-made Pegasus spyware has been used to monitor activists, journalists and politicians around the world highlight the diplomatic risks of nurturing and exporting "oppressive technology", experts warned. [Read More]
The United States and its allies have officially accused China of being behind the Microsoft Exchange attacks disclosed in early March. [Read More]
Ireland dramatically loosened international travel restrictions on Monday, joining an EU-wide pandemic passport scheme weeks later than the rest of the bloc after a ransomware attack hobbled healthcare IT systems. [Read More]
Israel's NSO Group has been linked to a list of 50,000 smartphone numbers, including those of activists, journalists, business executives and politicians around the world. [Read More]
Microsoft's security response team late Thursday acknowledged a new, unpatched bug that exposes Windows users to privilege escalation attacks. [Read More]
A security flaw in Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance (ASA) and Firepower Threat Defense (FTD) software could allow a remote attacker to trigger a denial-of-service condition. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Idan Aharoni's picture
Many organizations are steadfast in their belief that dark web monitoring is a critical part of their security operations and the security industry is happy to fuel that belief.
Alastair Paterson's picture
Researchers have undertaken a deep dive into the shadowy, cyber world of those whose work involves abusing others online through trickery, extortion, fraud, and theft resulting from COVID-19.
Justin Fier's picture
CISA has recently designated many cyber security positions ‘essential roles', and our understanding of essential businesses and essential employees will continue to change as the pandemic evolves.
Alastair Paterson's picture
The barriers to entering the field of cybercrime have been significantly lowered, and for modest amounts of money, would-be scammers can buy high-quality phishing tools online.
Torsten George's picture
Most of today’s cyber-attacks are front ended by phishing campaigns. So, what can organizations do to prevent their users from falling for the bait of these attacks?
Laurence Pitt's picture
Many of us are familiar with the two most common types of socially engineered attacks – phishing and spear-phishing – but there are many more to be aware of.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Although robocalls are a pain for many of us, action is being taken to bring the problem under control.
Alastair Paterson's picture
The holidays are also a bonanza for cybercriminals whose own sales and purchases of contraband on the dark web mirror the one-day-only specials of their consumer-facing counterparts.
Alastair Paterson's picture
Domain name typo-squatting is an established tactic in the world of cybercrime.
John Maddison's picture
Intent-based segmentation, deception technology, and an integrated security fabric are essential tools in beating malware designed to avoid detection and analysis.