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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Federal and state officials are working with Onslow Water and Sewer Authority after hackers attacked some of its computer systems. [Read More]
Apple, Cisco, Mozilla, Kaspersky and others are concerned about Australia's encryption laws, despite the government specifically claiming it will not weaken encryption [Read More]
A former NASA contractor who allegedly threatened to publish nude photos of seven women unless they sent him other explicit pictures has pleaded guilty to federal charges. [Read More]
Cybersecurity agencies in the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand release joint report on publicly available hacking tools [Read More]
Facebook on Thursday said it shut down 251 accounts for breaking rules against spam and coordinated deceit, some of it by ad farms pretending to be forums for political debate. [Read More]
Hackers exploit the Drupal vulnerability known as Drupalgeddon2 to install a backdoor on compromised servers [Read More]
A new piece of malware named Exaramel provides evidence that the Industroyer/Crashoverride malware used in the 2016 Ukraine power outage is linked to NotPetya [Read More]
The MuddyWater cyber-espionage campaign was observed using spear-phishing emails to target entities in more countries [Read More]
A group of hackers believed to be operating out of China was observed using popular Microsoft Office exploits for the delivery of malware [Read More]
Magecart, the web-based card skimmer campaign that targets popular e-commerce sites, has hit Shopper Approved, an organization that provides rating seals for online stores [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Alastair Paterson's picture
By closely following trends watching for new activities and actors across a variety of data sources, security professionals can continue to take steps to mitigate the digital risk to their enterprises, partners and customers.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
Galina Antova's picture
We must recognize industrial cyberattacks as tactics in a new form of “economic warfare” being waged between nation-states to gain economic and political advantage without having to pay the price of open combat.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
Historical patterns and recent activity indicate that another major Necurs malware outbreak is looming just around the corner.
Markus Jakobsson's picture
Men and women may jokingly refer to their significant other as their “partner in crime,” but when it comes to romance scams, this joke may become a sad reality.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
Even organizations with the most robust defense solutions and advanced automated technologies cannot effectively combat threats such as BEC without the adequate support and nuanced expertise of humans.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
It remains to be seen whether more legitimate web operations will embrace the approach, but you can count on illegitimate and malicious use of cryptomining to grow robustly.