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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A recently patched Windows zero-day vulnerability tracked as CVE-2019-0859 had been exploited to deliver a PowerShell backdoor. [Read More]
Microsoft has been collaborating with researchers linked to a Chinese military-backed university on artificial intelligence, elevating concerns that US firms are contributing to China's high-tech surveillance and censorship apparatus. [Read More]
Matrix.org, an open source project for secure and decentralized communications, had its systems hacked and its website defaced. The hacker then revealed the security issues he found. [Read More]
Two of the most powerful Ministers in the UK government, the secretary of state for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) and the secretary of state for the Home Department, have published a document, titled Online Harms White Paper, [Read More]
Feedback Friday: Industry professionals comment on the news that the group behind the Triton/Trisis malware has hit an additional critical infrastructure facility. [Read More]
Two Romanians have been convicted in the United States for their role in a longstanding online fraud operation that incurred millions of dollars in losses. [Read More]
Using cryptography and virtual drop boxes, Julian Assange's WikiLeaks created a revolutionary new model for media to lure massive digitized leaks from whistleblowers, exposing everything from US military secrets to wealthy tax-dodgers' illicit offshore accounts. [Read More]
Julian Assange's indictment on narrow charges of hacking conspiracy seems to concede that his activities, as damaging as they have been, could be protected by constitutional freedom of the press guarantees. [Read More]
Russian lawmakers approve a bill that would allow Moscow to cut the country's internet traffic from foreign servers, in a key second reading paving the way for legislation that activists fear is a step towards online isolation. [Read More]
Kaspersky publishes new report on the activities of the Hamas-linked Gaza Cybergang and claims much of its infrastructure has been disrupted. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Siggi Stefnisson's picture
If I have one wish for ‘Cybersecurity Awareness Month,’ it’s that we all need to be aware of the need for innovative responses on the part of the security industry, to counter a threat industry which is innovating both technical and business models at a rapid pace.
Devon Kerr's picture
If phishing attacks slip past the first line of defense, security teams need to be able to identify suspicious activity and stop it before hackers can learn enough about their enterprise to execute a full attack.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Studying the DNC Hacker case shows just how difficult it is to maintain a false identity in the face of a highly resourced and motivated opponent.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Actively investigating and infiltrating criminal groups online is not “hacking back,” but it may provoke that as a response.
Alastair Paterson's picture
Malicious actors have been experimenting with a blockchain domain name system (DNS) as a way of hiding their malicious activity and bullet-proofing their offerings.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Laurence Pitt's picture
While awareness is key and technology is a great assistant, there is one simple practice we can all adopt: think before you click or share.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”