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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The UK-based delivery service says deliveries might be delayed in some cases. [Read More]
Aqua Security releases open source tool for auditing the software supply chain to ensure compliance with newly created CIS guidelines. [Read More]
Belgian and Dutch police, coordinated by Europol, dismantled a cybercrime group that made millions through phishing and other types of schemes. [Read More]
Focused on government organizations and military entities, the group is characterized by the use of two malware families: the Samurai backdoor and the Ninja trojan. [Read More]
SYN Ventures is leading a $23 million Series A investment in RevealSecurity, a startup building technology to thwart malicious insider threats. [Read More]
Flagstar Bank has disclosed a data breach in which threat actors accessed files containing the personal information of 1.5 million individuals. [Read More]
Air raid sirens sounded in Israeli cities on Sunday and it appears they may have been triggered by hackers possibly operating out of Iran. [Read More]
The German Green party, which is part of the country’s governing coalition, says its IT system was hit by a cyberattack last month that affected email accounts belonging to Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock and Economy Minister Robert Habeck. [Read More]
Users warned of a new wave of DeadBolt ransomware attacks targeting QNAP NAS devices that run on outdated versions of QTS 4.x. [Read More]
The miscreants created a dedicated website to leak stolen information of employees and customers, in an attempt to pressure the victim organization into paying the ransom. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Derek Manky's picture
Public and private entities need to collaborate by sharing threat information and attack data to make attacks more difficult and resource-intensive for cybercriminals.
Jeff Orloff's picture
Most organizations rely too heavily on their cybersecurity pros to protect them from threats, ignoring the painful reality that human error is by far the most common cause of security breaches.
Derek Manky's picture
Botnets are becoming more malicious, sometimes able to create hundreds of thousands of drones that can attack a variety of machines, including Mac systems, Linux, Windows systems, edge devices, IoT devices, and so on.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Despite having different infrastructure, goals and methods, threat actors do not work in a vacuum. They feed off of each other.
Derek Manky's picture
How can organizations fight ransomware? The best solution is always prevention. Here are three tactics toward that goal.
Joshua Goldfarb's picture
The question of the importance of the state of a client device is a debate that has been around for a few years in the security field.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Plausible deniability provides a massive operational leeway to military operations in cyberspace, enabling governments to take actions without risking an all-out war.
Keith Ibarguen's picture
Leveraging humans for detection makes it hard for the attackers to predict whether or not their malicious emails will be identified and using technology to automate response provides scale and speed in resolution.
Idan Aharoni's picture
The fact that so many large and high-profile enterprises fall prey to ransomware attacks that in many cases does not pose any new technical challenge suggests that there are still many gaps that needs to be closed.
Derek Manky's picture
We tend to focus on the attack surface when it comes to cybersecurity, but the reality is, much like an iceberg, there’s so much more lurking beneath the surface.