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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Nigerian and US authorities said Tuesday that nearly 300 people had been arrested in a months-long global crackdown on online scams to hijack wire transfers from companies and individuals. [Read More]
A former Haverford College student pleaded guilty to trying to hack the IRS from a school computer lab to obtain President Donald Trump's tax returns. [Read More]
Avast and French police have cleaned up 850,000 computers infected with Retadup malware after taking control of its C&C server. [Read More]
A U.S. judge ordered a woman accused of hacking Capital One and at least 30 other organizations to remain in custody pending trial because she is a flight risk and poses a physical danger to herself and others. [Read More]
Federal prosecutors say Paige Thompson, the woman accused of hacking Capital One and at least 30 other organizations, is a threat to herself and society, a flight risk and should be kept locked up until her trial. [Read More]
Apple, Google and Mozilla respond to Kazakhstan’s efforts to spy on its citizens by requiring them to install a root certificate on their devices. [Read More]
Twitter said Monday it has suspended more than 200,000 accounts that it believes were part of a Chinese government influence campaign targeting the protest movement in Hong Kong. [Read More]
Hacker Elliot Gunton has been sentenced to 20 months in prison by Norwich (UK) County Court, but released immediately because of time already served in custody. [Read More]
Uganda and Zambia have denied a report that employees of Chinese telecom giant Huawei had helped them spy on political opponents. [Read More]
Servers found in Paige A. Thompson's bedroom contained data stolen from more than 30 unnamed companies, educational institutions and other entities. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.
John Vecchi's picture
Understanding the various types of malicious actors targeting your networks, including their motivations and modus operandi, is key to identifying, expelling and expunging them.
Gant Redmon's picture
When it comes to cybercrime, the police really can’t and aren’t going to protect residents of your town. The same goes for all towns and cities. Unless you’re talking a high six-figure theft, it's unlikely an officer will be assigned to your case.
Rod Rasmussen's picture
In this second column in a two part series, Rod tackles the impact of the DNSChanger malware and simple solutions to counter similar DNS attacks on enterprises and major government agencies.
Chris Poulin's picture
To effectively defend yourself against an enemy, you have to think like your adversary. Put yourself in their mind, their shoes. What’s the motive? How determined are they? Will they stop at a well-hardened network perimeter or move on to other tactics, including social engineering? Once you suffer a breach, how do you share your analysis?
Idan Aharoni's picture
The worlds of counter terrorism and fraud prevention should increase their ties. Systems that are already implemented in one world may be applied to the other. Solution providers and policy makers from both worlds need to meet up and share ideas, thoughts and experience for the benefit of both.
Noa Bar-Yosef's picture
This week, we highlight a mix of tools and tool types that security researchers should have in their weapons in arsenal, including tools unveiled for the first time at the Black Hat conference.
Michael Goff's picture
Once a Software Vendor discovers that their software has been pirated, the gut reaction is to put an immediate stop to it. If piracy is discovered, it’s best to react, but don’t overreact. Be proactive, yet patient.